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MSM DRM Driver In Linux 4.3 To Bring Initial HDCP Support

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  • MSM DRM Driver In Linux 4.3 To Bring Initial HDCP Support

    Phoronix: MSM DRM Driver In Linux 4.3 To Bring Initial HDCP Support

    Besides Rob Clark being busy implementing GLES/GL 3 in Freedreno Gallium3D, over in kernel-space he has a slew of new improvements to land in its MSM DRM driver for Linux 4.3...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-MSM-Linux-4.3

  • #2
    What's the best way to show/give support for Rob Clark?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by My8th View Post
      What's the best way to show/give support for Rob Clark?
      Give him likes in Facebook, or +1 in Google+

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      • #4
        Meh, fuck DRM, HDCP and content protection.

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        • #5
          How did he manage to implement HDCP? Did he use the keys that are floating out there? Or some dedicated hardware?
          Either way, I don't really see the point implementing this. I would rather see the decoder portion
          Am I mistaken? If so, please enlighten me.

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          • #6
            Yes because people would rather have the stuff that they paid for not work :-\ It would be lovely if everything was DRM free until then we need people like Rob getting the drivers working with things like DHCP

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            • #7
              Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
              How did he manage to implement HDCP? Did he use the keys that are floating out there? Or some dedicated hardware?
              Either way, I don't really see the point implementing this. I would rather see the decoder portion
              Am I mistaken? If so, please enlighten me.
              The HDCP implementation comes from one of the qcom developers. (In fact they are contributing most of the kernel side patches these days, I mostly just review patches, merge and send pull req's..) The key handling is done by hw and/or trustzone, it isn't in the driver. I think this is probably typical for SoC's, because basically every android device supports HDCP. The kernel code mostly handles the HDCP state machine.

              Anyways, regardless of what I think about HDCP, I think it is good to reduce the amount of patching that downstream android kernels need to do on top of upstream, when it comes to hw enablement. And I suspect that there is some room to refactor the state machine out into some shared helpers, but that will be easier to judge once we have HDCP implementations for more than one driver.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
                How did he manage to implement HDCP? Did he use the keys that are floating out there? Or some dedicated hardware?
                Either way, I don't really see the point implementing this. I would rather see the decoder portion
                Am I mistaken? If so, please enlighten me.
                I wondered about that too. HDCP is the thing Microsoft had to implement a whole "Protected Media Path" in Windows in order to have permission to use.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                  Meh, fuck DRM, HDCP and content protection.
                  As long as you don't confuse the DRM in the headline with bad DRM as related to HDCP.
                  But FWIW, HDCP is quite thoroughly broken, so implementing it is actually a *good* thing, since it gives you a path to rip HDCP protected media.

                  I.e., if you need to run some program that refuses to work without HDCP, then you CAN, and then stick an HDCP stripper on the output HDMI plug, and end up with clean HDMI.
                  Last edited by droidhacker; 08-17-2015, 10:10 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Someone mentioned Windows having to use "protected media path" to get permission to handle HDCP media. . Probably it would have been cracked as soon as Windows Vista came out if Microsoft had implemented it without the protected path and without reference to any code licensed by Hollywood or the hardware makers. They could have done this, all keys are in the media or the hardware, not the software. Probably that would have caused Hollywood to stop releasing on Blu-Ray, or licenses for Blu-Ray players made for PCs to use the HDCP and other DRM keys to be revoked. That would have been a GOOD thing, as it would have caused Blu-ray to join Diigital Audio Tape and Sony minidisc as a techology killed by copy controls.Putting the "protected path" aside, once you have source for a "digital restictions management" program, it's as good as cracked. It's just that this one has already been cracked, so there's nothing left for Hollywood to protect by interfering.

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