Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

AMDGPU Driver Called For Pulling Into DRM-Next For Linux 4.2 Kernel

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • AMDGPU Driver Called For Pulling Into DRM-Next For Linux 4.2 Kernel

    Phoronix: AMDGPU Driver Called For Pulling Into DRM-Next For Linux 4.2 Kernel

    While it should come as no surprise, Alex Deucher of AMD tonight submitted the AMDGPU kernel driver code for pulling into DRM-Next so that it can land for the Linux 4.2 kernel merge window...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...rnel-Linux-4,2

  • #2
    However, for now this driver limits power management to the new Carrizo APUs
    Will that means that we could fry our GPU because it will get too hot, like I did a couple of years ago with my Radeon HD 5650 (not sure if it was the power management or the poor HP laptop cooling system quality)

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by mbouchar View Post

      Will that means that we could fry our GPU because it will get too hot, like I did a couple of years ago with my Radeon HD 5650 (not sure if it was the power management or the poor HP laptop cooling system quality)
      No frying. A video card that is not faulty is able to run at 100% capacity 24/7 at least until the end of the warranty period.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by mbouchar View Post

        Will that means that we could fry our GPU because it will get too hot, like I did a couple of years ago with my Radeon HD 5650 (not sure if it was the power management or the poor HP laptop cooling system quality)
        Rather than frying your GPU, it simply means that the longevity of your battery life will be terrible as it won't be able to reduce excess power where it isn't needed. Your GPU frying is most definitely the result of poor cooling and/or dust.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by mbouchar View Post

          Will that means that we could fry our GPU because it will get too hot, like I did a couple of years ago with my Radeon HD 5650 (not sure if it was the power management or the poor HP laptop cooling system quality)
          What it means is that your GPU will run at the low default clock speeds, and perform really poorly.

          I hope they can get the DPM support done quickly.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by phoronix View Post
            -- along with an experimental kernel build-time option to test this driver on other CI hardware.
            Does this mean older hardware, like the 2** series for example? Could we still benefit from the new kernel, maybe?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by mao_dze_dun View Post
              Does this mean older hardware, like the 2** series for example?
              "2** series" consist of 4 architectures: Terascale 2, GCN 1.0, GCN 1.1 and GCN 1.2 based cards. CI means GCN 1.1 cards like HD7790, R7 260 and R9 290:

              http://xorg.freedesktop.org/wiki/Rad...ture/#index5h2

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by dungeon View Post

                "2** series" consist of 4 architectures: Terascale 2, GCN 1.0, GCN 1.1 and GCN 1.2 based cards. CI means GCN 1.1 cards like HD7790, R7 260 and R9 290:

                http://xorg.freedesktop.org/wiki/Rad...ture/#index5h2

                So, as an owner of a 290x I could potentially luck out?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by mao_dze_dun View Post
                  So, as an owner of a 290x I could potentially luck out?
                  That is HAWAII card, so yeah you can test amdgpu driver But do not expect anything much as CI is not really supported there, that is just for testing.

                  In kernel 4.2 general public will see amdgpu driver for the first time, breakthrough is with Carrizo APU as best supported.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mbouchar View Post
                    Will that means that we could fry our GPU because it will get too hot, like I did a couple of years ago with my Radeon HD 5650 (not sure if it was the power management or the poor HP laptop cooling system quality)


                    People, where is the problem?
                    Power management of AMDGPU is limited to Carrizo - which it was mainly intended for (and future generations) and probably that R9 285 Tonga. The already existing driver will continue to work and exist. AMDGPU is no new wondrous driver, it is just a driver for Carizzo and + that allows easy switching of the userland part (choose fglrx/Catalyst or the free stack) without recompiling or tainting kernels. And no kernel version vs. fglrx mismatch anymore. So it's a nice thing for Carrizo and the likes but all other chips will be fine, too with their currently existing drivers.
                    Maybe it is possible to extend this type of support on some other chips later.

                    And a 5650 ... I'm surprised it would get that hot. Especially since this is likely a mobile derivative and 5650 was available as dedicated card even with passive cooling.
                    Stop TCPA, stupid software patents and corrupt politicians!

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X