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Radeon Software Adrenalin 2020 Edition Updated With WSL Support

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  • Radeon Software Adrenalin 2020 Edition Updated With WSL Support

    Phoronix: Radeon Software Adrenalin 2020 Edition Updated With WSL Support

    Along with Intel and NVIDIA offering new Windows drivers with WSL2 support, AMD has released an updated Radeon Software Adrenalin 2020 Edition driver with support for Windows Subsystem for Linux...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...tware-For-WSL2

  • #2
    ...ok, that sucks.

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    • #3
      would one use virtual machine for cuda/opencl/whatever (in the quest os) instead of using the host os? are there better software support for linux than windows?
      or i'm mistaking directml with cuda and the like?

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      • #4
        I think it's pretty obvious by now, but Microsoft is making Windows the best development environment for Linux, plus it supports software and games that are unavailable for Linux. If Linux developers (and some users) move to Windows, it's only a matter of time before the majority of Linux installations are done through WSL, and then eventually none at all. Embrace, extend, extinguish.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by OpenSourceAnarchist View Post
          I think it's pretty obvious by now, but Microsoft is making Windows the best development environment for Linux, plus it supports software and games that are unavailable for Linux. If Linux developers (and some users) move to Windows, it's only a matter of time before the majority of Linux installations are done through WSL, and then eventually none at all. Embrace, extend, extinguish.
          I think it's plainly obvious too, but I also believe that the power in Linux is the fact it's open source. All of this code that has been produced is going to continue existing and MS can't do ANYTHING about that. MS has no chance at all to keep up with the pace of OSS development. Look at hardware support in the kernel tree as an example, MS simply can't compete with Linux in native in tree hardware support.

          MS is obviously trying, but I think they'll obviously fail.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by duby229 View Post
            I think it's plainly obvious too, but I also believe that the power in Linux is the fact it's open source. All of this code that has been produced is going to continue existing and MS can't do ANYTHING about that. MS has no chance at all to keep up with the pace of OSS development.
            They don't need to keep pace, if they can obsolete the FOSS. I.e. they "extend" the feature set of WSL, to where commercial software (e.g. Oracle Database) becomes compatible with WSL, but not with regular Linux. That's the "extinguish" part.

            Originally posted by duby229 View Post
            Look at hardware support in the kernel tree as an example, MS simply can't compete with Linux in native in tree hardware support.
            But they don't have to, since WSL runs on top of Windows hardware drivers.

            Originally posted by duby229 View Post
            MS is obviously trying, but I think they'll obviously fail.
            I do hope you're right.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
              They don't need to keep pace, if they can obsolete the FOSS. I.e. they "extend" the feature set of WSL, to where commercial software (e.g. Oracle Database) becomes compatible with WSL, but not with regular Linux. That's the "extinguish" part.


              But they don't have to, since WSL runs on top of Windows hardware drivers.


              I do hope you're right.
              But then in that scenario we just return to the current status quo. It won't be able to kill linux. If MS extends WSL to the point that software written for WSL won't run natively on linux, then someone somewhere will extend wine to support it, or will write a whole new emulator to support it. It would just be a return to the current status quo and that's not too bad. The current status isn't too bad and that's the very worst that MS would be capable of accomplishing.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
                They don't need to keep pace, if they can obsolete the FOSS. I.e. they "extend" the feature set of WSL, to where commercial software (e.g. Oracle Database) becomes compatible with WSL, but not with regular Linux. That's the "extinguish" part.
                If that were to happen, and I very much doubt it, you'd have to talk to the developers of that particular software (e.g. Oracle) and not Microsoft; they'd be the ones deciding not to code for Linux.

                I, for one, welcome any improvement they bring to WSL. For now I'm still using MSYS2 when I'm on Windows and I need some resemblance of a Linux programming environment, but they way things are going I may need to check it out.

                To think they had SUA back in the day and didn't get the kind of traction WSL is getting shows the extent of how useful Linux is for the industry . Besides, when I was at uni most of us (if not all) in there were running Linux one way or another, even if some people were just using it for some of the courses it was pushed instead of other OSes; I'm not surprised people at Microsoft are showing a modicum of change towards their ways (at least), after all graduates have already been working for several years.

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                • #9
                  WSL2 May make a dent in 'pure' Linux's use by programmers, but I don't see how it would extinguish Linux at all.

                  Linux would still be extremely useful in the server space, and I cannot think of any reason why a 'regular' user would be less likely to install Linux as a desktop OS thanks to the introduction of WSL2. The lure of Linux does not consist in its having compelling consumer software that is not also available for Windows or Mac. LibreOffice, Krita, Darktable - they're all available for Windows. The reason why I use Linux (I am not a programmer myself) is that it frees me from MS's forced updates and its telemetry, makes it easier to modify my system, and allows me to use KDE - which I far prefer to the Windows UI. No version of WSL is going to give me all of these advantages. I imagine that for many other Linux users similar considerations play a role.

                  Last edited by Cattus_D; 06-18-2020, 02:02 AM.

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                  • #10
                    wsl2 allows to have the best from both worlds and i am looking forward to test it for the following reasons:
                    • At the company I work for only win pcs are allowed as desktop os → as a developer/data analyst I can use all the linux tools directly on my pc without using remote systems
                    • laptops still have many linux issues… my thinkpad x1 gen6 (which was certified for linux…) had more than a year a bug that the touchpad was not working after a suspend.
                    • there is a lot software which just works better on windows:
                      • watching videos on linux drains the battery like hell due to missing hardware acceleration
                      • gaming
                      • windows office etc.
                    So i will consider using windows with wsl2 on my laptops, even if I would prefer pure linux

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