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It's The Season For Cleaning & Restructuring Within The Intel Linux Kernel Graphics Code

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  • It's The Season For Cleaning & Restructuring Within The Intel Linux Kernel Graphics Code

    Phoronix: It's The Season For Cleaning & Restructuring Within The Intel Linux Kernel Graphics Code

    With Intel's Icelake/Gen11 graphics support considered production-ready when on the latest Linux graphics driver components and ahead of the real enablement around their highly anticipated Xe Graphics discrete hardware, it's making for a summer of clean-ups and restructuring within their kernel Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...eason-Cleaning

  • #2
    All of these different names and functions of Intel's latest drivers/software is confusing. i915 for the kernel DRM, iris/iHD for mesa, compute-runtime (neo) for OpenCL, media-driver for libva/vaapi, plus vulkan and DRI drivers (or opt for modesetting and no Intel GuC/HuC/DMC firmware). Distros/Intel should provide two meta-packages for everything: one current and one for legacy devices (with the option of manually installing individual packages if desired). Everyone would benefit.

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    • #3
      Let's wait and see what their new hardware will bring to the table and what their strategy will be to gain market share. With the current pricing of AMD and Nvidia, there is some room for a value player and Intel needs to win us consumers over somehow. Yes, what an irony that would be if Intel were the value option.

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      • #4
        Compartamentalizing?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
          Compartamentalizing?
          It was correct. If you type "Compartamentalizing" to google, it will tell you "showing results for Compartmentalizing".

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          • #6
            Oh, though maybe you meant there was an excess a, which was already edited out. Then I got it backwards.

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            • #7
              I wonder how theGVT-g code would be affected, and what kind of virtualization support will the Xe have.

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              • #8
                I am curious to see this discreet chip. However I believe that unless Nvidia rests on their laurels it will be very hard beating them. They are miles ahead of the competition in GPUs. AMD's Navi arrived a year later than RTX and still does not support ray tracing. By thr time they catch up Nvidia will be ever further ahead.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by zoomblab View Post
                  I am curious to see this discreet chip. However I believe that unless Nvidia rests on their laurels it will be very hard beating them. They are miles ahead of the competition in GPUs. AMD's Navi arrived a year later than RTX and still does not support ray tracing. By thr time they catch up Nvidia will be ever further ahead.
                  Perhaps.

                  It's typically easier and cheaper to do catch-up, and most people are not buying the **80's, nor the RTX versions, which means for them AMD GPUs are just as good if not the optimal choice.

                  As for us Linux users, well, is there really any question? I'd pick AMD in a heartbeat if I was to buy something right now.

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