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Intel Launches The Xeon D 2100, Up To 18 Core SoCs

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  • Intel Launches The Xeon D 2100, Up To 18 Core SoCs

    Phoronix: Intel Launches The Xeon D 2100, Up To 18 Core SoCs

    Intel today lifted the lid on the Xeon D-2100 series, what used to be known as Skylake-D...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...el-Xeon-D-2100

  • #2
    I have a question. Why are "enthusiast" consumer processors (like the 7980XE) clocked higher than high-core-count server/workstation processors?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
      I have a question. Why are "enthusiast" consumer processors (like the 7980XE) clocked higher than high-core-count server/workstation processors?
      I guess, enthusiast segment is not only about core count, more about single-core performance for the raw horse-power (to use it in games, for example). And server systems are more about thread count (i.e. for many VMs or many HTTP requests at once) and stable operation (which can be affected by high clock speeds).

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      • #4
        Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
        I have a question. Why are "enthusiast" consumer processors (like the 7980XE) clocked higher than high-core-count server/workstation processors?
        Server processors are clocked a bit lower for several reasons, reliability (often longer or more robust warranty) and sometimes have more cores meaning higher clocks might exceed the TDP of standard Sever thermal solutions, as well as efficiency performance/watt is important for severs.

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        • #5
          No mention about the prices in the article.
          Seems kind of expensive: https://www.anandtech.com/show/12409...ries-socs-edge

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          • #6
            Originally posted by xxmitsu View Post
            No mention about the prices in the article.
            Seems kind of expensive: https://www.anandtech.com/show/12409...ries-socs-edge
            They are supposed to be next gen of Atom-based networking/server boards, prices for the boards (C-2000) were 500-1000$ a pop back in the day, or they became appliances like firewalls, routers and other high-end stuff for companies.

            These things are not going to be cheaper than that.

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            • #7
              Under 100W TDP? Too much for me.

              I do like having 16W TDP for a server as a router and 35W TDP for a file/media server and another 16W TDP server for NVR (video surveillance). If I am going to have fans in my server, I would like it to be inaudible, although I'd rather prefer if a server with a 16W TDP could be fanless.

              I'd like to have 3 servers in a 1.5U chassis with a very short depth, but sadly, it's out of stock in Newegg.
              https://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...82E16811128067

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              • #8
                I assume that those cpus are affected by spectre and meltdown bugs

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
                  I have a question. Why are "enthusiast" consumer processors (like the 7980XE) clocked higher than high-core-count server/workstation processors?
                  Marketing and different loads.
                  Enthusiasts use GHz as a penis length enhancer.
                  The chip will throttle faster, but it will have higher alpha strike for a few seconds. If the consumer is gaming, this would be better.

                  On servers the load is much more constant, so it would be pointless to "lie" like this.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Azrael5 View Post
                    I assume that those cpus are affected by spectre and meltdown bugs
                    Why assuming, they are affected Intel even marketise with bench results before mitigations

                    According to data supplied by Intel, the D-2100 offers up to 29 percent L3 network packet transfer performance improvement, up to 2.9 times the network performance improvement, and up to 2.8 times storage performance improvements compared to its D-1500 chips

                    However, Intel is quick to note that all the performance tests and benchmark data it supplied were obtained prior to implementation of recent software patches and firmware updates intended to address the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities, so things might change after the application of these patches.
                    http://www.zdnet.com/article/intel-u...00-processors/

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