Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Heated KDBUS Debate For The Linux Kernel Has Fizzled Out

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The Heated KDBUS Debate For The Linux Kernel Has Fizzled Out

    Phoronix: The Heated KDBUS Debate For The Linux Kernel Has Fizzled Out

    KDBUS, the new in-kernel IPC mechanism modeled after D-Bus, wasn't accepted for Linux 4.1. Since the end of the Linux 4.1 merge window, the debate over KDBUS continued, but in the past two weeks the discussion settled down...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...US-Fizzled-May

  • #2
    Was it really worth a news?
    ## VGA ##
    AMD: X1950XTX, HD3870, HD5870
    Intel: GMA45, HD3000 (Core i5 2500K)

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by darkbasic View Post
      Was it really worth a news?
      You clicked it didn't you?
      Clicks = Ad Views = Money for Michael
      so apparently yes it was worth it for him.

      Comment


      • #4
        Harald Hoyer is employed by Red Hat and is one of the systemd developers
        Why am I not surprised that the guy is pushing KDBUS now.

        And systemd fanboys still claim that Red Hat has no hidden agenda...

        Comment


        • #5
          Do you think KDBUS will make it into the kernel under its current design? Have systemd developers gone too far? Share your thoughts by commenting on this article in our forums.


          Systemd developers have not gone far enough, imho.

          Comment


          • #6
            Plumber, the IPC system from Plan 9 from Bell Labs is superior to D-Bus.
            KDBUS is implemented as a socket type, reached by AF_DBUS.
            Plumber is much simplier and you just read/write to a virtual file on the file system.

            Hence Plumber is more Unix, in the way that it follows the Unix philosophy "everything is a file".
            Also, since remote file systems may be mounted (done using 9P on Plan 9) it is also network transparent.

            https://lists.debian.org/debian-user.../msg00802.html

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by prodigy_ View Post
              Why am I not surprised that the guy is pushing KDBUS now.

              And systemd fanboys still claim that Red Hat has no hidden agenda...
              It sure sucks at being hidden if they push for features on PUBLIC mailing lists.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                Plumber, the IPC system from Plan 9 from Bell Labs is superior to D-Bus.
                In theory, perhaps. But it suffers from one big flaw - namely, that almost nobody actually uses it, whereas D-Bus has been the IPC mechanism of choice on Linux for the past decade. Technical superiority (real or imagined) has only passing relevance to which technology actually wins.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Luke_Wolf View Post
                  You clicked it didn't you?
                  Clicks = Ad Views = Money for Michael
                  so apparently yes it was worth it for him.
                  I'm premium+adblock, no ads here.
                  ## VGA ##
                  AMD: X1950XTX, HD3870, HD5870
                  Intel: GMA45, HD3000 (Core i5 2500K)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by prodigy_ View Post
                    Why am I not surprised that the guy is pushing KDBUS now.

                    And systemd fanboys still claim that Red Hat has no hidden agenda...
                    Yeah, hidden agenda to make reasonably modern operational system, while still keeping all elements optional. Ohh, the horror.

                    Ahh, I forgot "I can't dig systemd, therefore it must be some sort of lock in" argument here. When Linux users lost their sense of discovery and got frightened of changes?

                    Yes, I am a bit nervous about all those changes as well (just learned to live with systemd and journald and it's all ok), still, KDBUS makes a lot of sense. It is a de facto standard for mainstream Linux desktop software, like it or not. As anything similar in kernel, it will be optional.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X