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One Of LLVM's Top Contributors Quits Development Over CoC, Outreach Program

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  • One Of LLVM's Top Contributors Quits Development Over CoC, Outreach Program

    Phoronix: One Of LLVM's Top Contributors Quits Development Over CoC, Outreach Program

    Rafael Avila de Espindola is the fifth most active contributor to LLVM with more than 4,300 commits since 2006, but now he has decided to part ways with the project...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...fael-Espindola

  • #2
    People working on stuff should be selected based on skill, not gender. Tech and politics don't go well together. Did they learn nothing from the FreeBSD fiasco?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by eydee View Post
      People working on stuff should be selected based on skill, not gender. Tech and politics don't go well together. Did they learn nothing from the FreeBSD fiasco?
      What happened there?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by eydee View Post
        People working on stuff should be selected based on skill, not gender. Tech and politics don't go well together. Did they learn nothing from the FreeBSD fiasco?
        I agree, but unfortunately IT is against that.

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        • #5
          So he basically didn't like that they where looking for new developers amongst specific groups?

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          • #6
            I wonder what makes otherwise sane people (I mean Rafael sounds otherwise sane) react in this insane manner. Of course Outreacy will "openly discriminates based on sex and ancestry" since it's a project designed to create outreach in specific groups. He acts like he thinks that LLVM will only accept devs from the Outreachy program which of course is not true.

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            • #7
              A true hero.

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              • #8
                And this little rant here:
                Somewhat recently a code of conduct was adopted. It says that the
                community tries to welcome people of all "political belief". Except those whose political belief mean that they don't agree with the code of conduct.
                So just how SJW/Feminazi and horrible is the LLVM CoC: Exactly which "political belief" does not agree with those points? I think even Nazis would agree that this is a OK list.

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                • #9
                  I didn't quite understand his frustration with Outreachy. How is it a problem for llvm?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by F.Ultra View Post
                    I wonder what makes otherwise sane people (I mean Rafael sounds otherwise sane) react in this insane manner. Of course Outreacy will "openly discriminates based on sex and ancestry" since it's a project designed to create outreach in specific groups. He acts like he thinks that LLVM will only accept devs from the Outreachy program which of course is not true.
                    An actively sexist program based on a misguided view of the world, and a set of oppressive speech codes seem like perfectly decent reasons to part ways with the project. National speech codes are a major reason why I'm emigrating from my home country.

                    The problem with repressive codes of conduct is that they can be represented as "reasonable" and "something no decent person would disagree with", while repressing people severely. The scale of consequences for the most minor of missteps, as judged by your accusers, make most codes of conduct rather chilling. I know I actively avoid investing time in projects with strict codes of conduct, because people who contribute basically nothing can get you booted from a community you worked hard to create, just by feeling offended. Some codes even include restrictions on your public communications outside the project.

                    Even if you're capable of adhering to the code of conduct, it has an effect on your relationship to a project. It tells you that politics is more important than achieving the technical goals. This sort of politicking has already severely impacted the NodeJS upstream.

                    There also seems to be this idea going around that there's an underutilized population of enthusiastic, experienced female software developers (or talented aspiring developers) whose only barrier to success is sexism; I'd like to see just one shred of evidence that this is the case, and not just some academic/HR department fantasy. To me it seems like the goal of discriminating against 90% of the talent pool directly contradicts the goals of a software development project: to produce and maintain a high quality solution to a set of technical problems.
                    Last edited by microcode; 02 May 2018, 05:52 PM.

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