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The Importance Of The TUXEDO Driver Package On Their Newer Ryzen Laptops

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  • The Importance Of The TUXEDO Driver Package On Their Newer Ryzen Laptops

    Phoronix: The Importance Of The TUXEDO Driver Package On Their Newer Ryzen Laptops

    As an important notice to those with new TUXEDO laptops such as the TUXEDO Pulse 14 Gen 3 powered by the Ryzen 7 7840HS, installing their DKMS-based driver package can be very important if aiming to achieve maximum performance.

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    But that's not to be confused with the standardized ACPI Platform Profile behavior that is also exposed under Linux via various interfaces.
    At least the Tuxedo DKMS driver now uses standardized interfaces for exposing keyboard LED control, but I don't get why they always create their own API. Even in their own drivers, there are at least three interfaces (two ioctl and one sysfs) for fan control. The control center if full of code to abstract the various interfaces to the driver. Maybe they have too few good developers or maybe they don't want a standardized solution that just works. It's also a shame that their driver is not upstream yet and it's not looking like that's about to change soon.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Eberhardt View Post

      At least the Tuxedo DKMS driver now uses standardized interfaces for exposing keyboard LED control, but I don't get why they always create their own API. Even in their own drivers, there are at least three interfaces (two ioctl and one sysfs) for fan control. The control center if full of code to abstract the various interfaces to the driver. Maybe they have too few good developers or maybe they don't want a standardized solution that just works. It's also a shame that their driver is not upstream yet and it's not looking like that's about to change soon.
      Heh, heh, it sounds like you just described Open Source Yet Proprietary.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Eberhardt View Post

        It's also a shame that their driver is not upstream yet and it's not looking like that's about to change soon.
        You can react to this GitLab issue if you want that to change. Hopefully, with enough user support/pressure they will properly upstream their drivers. Currently, they probably think user demand is not high enough... ๐Ÿ˜‘

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        • #5
          Originally posted by salim-b View Post

          You can react to this GitLab issue if you want that to change. Hopefully, with enough user support/pressure they will properly upstream their drivers. Currently, they probably think user demand is not high enough... ๐Ÿ˜‘
          Or they may be unable to. Unfortunately NDAs are common in the world of hardware documentation. Tuxedo likely sources their motherboards from 3rd parties. Traditional PC laptop (and desktop) board makers tend to consider their ACPI configurations and board interfaces as part of their secret sauce and a brand differentiator, especially since 90%+ of their users (not customers - Tuxedo is their customer, while Michael would be Tuxedo's customer and a downstream user instead of customer) are running Windows and likely couldn't be bothered to care anyway. It's kinda hard to blame them since ACPI configuration on PCs, especially laptops, has visible consequences in gaming the overly emphasized Geek Bench results in review articles which could mean lost sales.

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          • #6
            What about power efficiency, if that's the main concern do we still have to piss about with the tuxedo driver?

            Originally posted by stormcrow View Post

            Or they may be unable to. Unfortunately NDAs are common in the world of hardware documentation. Tuxedo likely sources their motherboards from 3rd parties. Traditional PC laptop (and desktop) board makers tend to consider their ACPI configurations and board interfaces as part of their secret sauce and a brand differentiator, especially since 90%+ of their users (not customers - Tuxedo is their customer, while Michael would be Tuxedo's customer and a downstream user instead of customer) are running Windows and likely couldn't be bothered to care anyway. It's kinda hard to blame them since ACPI configuration on PCs, especially laptops, has visible consequences in gaming the overly emphasized Geek Bench results in review articles which could mean lost sales.
            โ€‹The tuxedo pulse 14 gen 3 appears to be a linux version of the Schenker via pro 14 L23. Is Schenker some massive company that creates its own motherboards or is there another link in the chain?
            Last edited by geerge; 14 February 2024, 11:02 AM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by geerge View Post
              โ€‹The tuxedo pulse 14 gen 3 appears to be a linux version of the Schenker via pro 14 L23. Is Schenker some massive company that creates its own motherboards or is there another link in the chain?
              No they just buy their laptops from the same chinese manufacturer. Building your own notebook will result in much higher cost (see framework).

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              • #8
                No need for this for HP laptops using Ryzen APUs.

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                • #9
                  That performance gain for that power consumption increase doesn't seem worth it to me...

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by avis View Post
                    No need for this for HP laptops using Ryzen APUs.
                    You're speaking about those crippled UEFI/BIOS systems? I was unable to use amdkfd with my older ProBook, I'm unable to use pstate driver with my EliteBook. HP is shit when using Linux with their laptops

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