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A Number Of Intel/AMD x86 Updates Hit Linux 5.8

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  • A Number Of Intel/AMD x86 Updates Hit Linux 5.8

    Phoronix: A Number Of Intel/AMD x86 Updates Hit Linux 5.8

    A number of x86 (x86_64) pull requests have been sent in for the in-development Linux 5.8 kernel...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-5.8-x86-Pulls

  • #2
    a potentially stupid question...
    how does the size of the linux kernel affect performance of workloads? which ones? in what way? when? would it make sense to have a tool or profile that queries and enables only the options/features for your machine? maybe keep one generic kernel around as a fall back and if hardware changes...
    I tried to dabble with compiling the kernel myself a couple of years ago but the options were just too many in number and their effect unclear.
    ... and yes i believe it would be hell for bugtracking... (although maybe also a chance...) But is that the only reason..?

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    • #3
      As a Linux DevOps engineer most of my colleagues would always recommend Thinkpad laptops.

      But then you read that you need to wait for 5.8 to be able to get the freakin fans working correctly.

      Then I notice most of those colleagues tend to use Debian Linux with some old gnome2/mate/xfce like Desktop experience.. the kind of people who prefer to edit ifcfg files instead of using network-manager.. on a kernel aging from WW2..

      Fukk me right?

      Good luck with them fans..
      Last edited by MastaG; 06-02-2020, 12:39 PM.

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      • #4
        Support for finally being able to control dual fan ThinkPad laptops where as previously that ThinkPad driver code has only worked with single fan laptop models.
        FWIW, Monday's set of pulls also fixed fan detection on my Dell XPS 13 2-in-1:

        Code:
        commit b8a13e5e8f37eeca28da8ce027df7ab7f4a79cb4
        Author: Thomas Hebb <[email protected]>
        Date: Sat Apr 4 16:49:00 2020 -0400
        
        hwmon: (dell-smm) Use one DMI match for all XPS models

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        • #5
          Originally posted by MastaG View Post

          Then I notice most of those colleagues tend to use Debian Linux with some old gnome2/mate/xfce like Desktop experience.. the kind of people who prefer to edit ifcfg files instead of using network-manager.. on a kernel aging from WW2..
          Quoted For Truth

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          • #6
            I might be nitpicking but does this part look a bit redundant?

            Originally posted by phoronix View Post
            A number of x86 (x86_64) pull requests have been sent in for the in-development Linux 5.8kernel.

            Here are the latest pull requests on the Intel/AMD x86 CPU front. The x86/cpu changes include:

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            • #7
              Originally posted by jakubo View Post
              a potentially stupid question...
              how does the size of the linux kernel affect performance of workloads? which ones? in what way? when? would it make sense to have a tool or profile that queries and enables only the options/features for your machine? maybe keep one generic kernel around as a fall back and if hardware changes...
              I tried to dabble with compiling the kernel myself a couple of years ago but the options were just too many in number and their effect unclear.
              ... and yes i believe it would be hell for bugtracking... (although maybe also a chance...) But is that the only reason..?
              For general desktop use, the distribution kernel should be fine. If you have an embedded application, or old or memory limited hardware, building a custom kernel could have runtime performance benefits. Otherwise, the main win is probably the load time booting. (or possibly compiling to your specific machine arch, vs a more generic one.) Because a distribution tends to use an initrd and build most things as modules, they can rebuild the initrd to only contain the things your machine really needs. At least they should; you can check the /etc/mkinitcpio.conf to see if it has an autodetect, or manually edit what modules it includes. After that, hopefully the base kernel is not too bloated and it only loads the modules you need.

              You are right that the kernel configuration for compiling your own is insanely complicated. What you want to do there, is start with the kernel config that comes with your distribution, and either pare that down, or use the 'make localyesconfig' or 'make localmodconfig' option when already running a system working on your hardware. The theory being you will end up with a kernel that contains only the stuff you need for that machine. Mostly that is for tweakers though, and I mention it only as a starting hint for those that might want to explore that route. I mean you *can* cut out a lot of stuff, if you know what you truely only need...

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