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My Core i7 5960X + MSI X99 Experience So Far: It's Smoking, Really

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  • My Core i7 5960X + MSI X99 Experience So Far: It's Smoking, Really

    Phoronix: My Core i7 5960X + MSI X99 Experience So Far: It's Smoking, Really

    This weekend I was planning to publish the first Linux benchmarks for Intel's incredibly powerful Core i7 5960X Haswell-E processor with X99 motherboard and DDR4 system memory. Unfortunately, all I can tell you now is that it's smoking, quite literally!

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=20872

  • #2
    Yikes lets hope the CPU is ok! I'm not sure Intel will bother to send a replacement, but it is really cool they sent you one.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
      Yikes lets hope the CPU is ok! I'm not sure Intel will bother to send a replacement, but it is really cool they sent you one.
      For the past few years they always send out CPUs... Mobos and other stuff, not so often.
      Michael Larabel
      http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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      • #4
        You shouldn't put PCBs/PWBs on top of the bag that the board came in. Only the inside is protected. Depending on the bag, electricity can travel across the outer surface and damage the board (can result in a smoking board) . It won't happen all the time but it can. Just like people claiming they never had a problem putting together a PC and never grounding themselves (although some of them claim DOA parts...).

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        • #5
          Originally posted by pumahove View Post
          You shouldn't put PCBs/PWBs on top of the bag that the board came in. Only the inside is protected. Depending on the bag, electricity can travel across the outer surface and damage the board (can result in a smoking board) . It won't happen all the time but it can. Just like people claiming they never had a problem putting together a PC and never grounding themselves (although some of them claim DOA parts...).
          decided to house it inside a SilverStone Raven RV05 that I was in the process of reviewing. Everything went smooth up until powering it on... The Raven RV05 panels were off and the case not fully assembled.
          Guess you didn't read the article close enough.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
            Yikes lets hope the CPU is ok! I'm not sure Intel will bother to send a replacement, but it is really cool they sent you one.
            The good news at least is the graphics card nor SSD were damaged... Will see on Monday when new mobo arrives that hopefully DDR4 or CPU weren't damaged.
            Michael Larabel
            http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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            • #7
              Originally posted by thegeek6 View Post
              Originally posted by pumahove View Post
              You shouldn't put PCBs/PWBs on top of the bag that the board came in. Only the inside is protected. Depending on the bag, electricity can travel across the outer surface and damage the board (can result in a smoking board) . It won't happen all the time but it can. Just like people claiming they never had a problem putting together a PC and never grounding themselves (although some of them claim DOA parts...).
              decided to house it inside a SilverStone Raven RV05 that I was in the process of reviewing. Everything went smooth up until powering it on... The Raven RV05 panels were off and the case not fully assembled.
              Guess you didn't read the article close enough.
              I did read it. I also looked at the pictures (one has the board on top of the bag). The board could have already been damaged before it was even placed into the case. If you don't ground yourself or you placed the board on top of the bag or some other non-recommended surface then it's certainly possible to damage components on the board without knowing (static electricity doesn't have to be visible nor felt to occur and cause damage). The sparks and smoke only appear when you plug it in and turn on the power.

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              • #8
                Wow! You let the magic smoke out!

                Anyways, I've never had a spectacular failure like that. My stuff usually just quietly expires. More to the point though, I've never got a defective mobo(although some came with defective by design chipsets(thanks via)) and one DOA CPU (amd 4800+ x2 939)...

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by pumahove View Post
                  You shouldn't put PCBs/PWBs on top of the bag that the board came in. Only the inside is protected. Depending on the bag, electricity can travel across the outer surface and damage the board.
                  Are you sure about that?? If the bag can generate electro static discharge (ESD) on its outside it must not be present at any ESD approved workstation and is really unfit for its purpose! Being an EE pro I would also regard the bag as being the safest surface (equipment unpowered!) in an uncontrolled environment. Of course for El Cheapo consumer equipment you newer know...

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Veto View Post
                    Are you sure about that?? If the bag can generate electro static discharge (ESD) on its outside it must not be present at any ESD approved workstation and is really unfit for its purpose! Being an EE pro I would also regard the bag as being the safest surface (equipment unpowered!) in an uncontrolled environment. Of course for El Cheapo consumer equipment you newer know...
                    I'm not saying the bag generates electricity. An antistatic bag prevents electricity from going through the bag and to the device inside. If you're a professional electrical engineer then you should know that this is Faraday cage. External sources of electricity are spread across the outside surface instead of allowing them to go through. So if you have the board on the bag and shoot static electricity at the bag then the charge is spread across the outside surface of the bag due to its design. When that charge gets to the board (ie. solder joint) it can damage components on the boad. You may not even see any visible damage but it's there. The damage becomes apparent once you power on the board.

                    The contents of an antistatic should be removed at a static-free, grounded bench. Once removed the bag should be placed elsewhere.

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