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LVFS Exploring Alternate, Open-Source Firmware For Capable End-Of-Life Devices

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  • LVFS Exploring Alternate, Open-Source Firmware For Capable End-Of-Life Devices

    Phoronix: LVFS Exploring Alternate, Open-Source Firmware For Capable End-Of-Life Devices

    The Linux Vendor Firmware Service (LVFS) with Fwupd for firmware updating on Linux could soon be making it easier to transition older, end-of-life devices off official firmware packages and onto the likes of open-source Coreboot for capable aging PC hardware. This not only would make the system run on more free software but would extend the life of the hardware with firmware updates where the vendor has ceased their support...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...ative-Firmware

  • #2
    This would be really cool. Hopefully we come to our senses and also stop soldering storage / RAM, glueing the shit out of batteries, etc., but I know that won't really happen. I just checked for updates a few minutes ago on my kid's old Z440 and there was an update for the Logitech USB unifying receiver. LVFS/fwupdmgr are dope.

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    • #3
      Boy do I hope we get this, it would be really nice.

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      • #4
        And if it didn't work something like a law entry ex. "for not anymore supported by vendor must be documented free"

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Ground0 View Post
          And if it didn't work something like a law entry ex. "for not anymore supported by vendor must be documented free"
          You would also need a royalty-free licence for all 'intellectual property' used by the hardware. There is no point in having the documentation if you can't distribute copies of software which might also include third-party bugfixes or changes.

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          • #6
            This is a great idea, I really hope they pursue this further. 👍🏻

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            • #7
              While it would be great, it'll probably never happen (at least universally).

              Hope I'm wrong on that point, though.

              Companies have too much invested in our throwaway society.

              I'm frankly amazed Right to Repair actually seems to be gaining traction - although I'm definitely happy to see that it is.

              Honestly, opening up firmware options for EOL hardware would be the next logical extension to Right to Repair.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Paradigm Shifter View Post
                While it would be great, it'll probably never happen (at least universally).

                Hope I'm wrong on that point, though.

                Companies have too much invested in our throwaway society.

                I'm frankly amazed Right to Repair actually seems to be gaining traction - although I'm definitely happy to see that it is.

                Honestly, opening up firmware options for EOL hardware would be the next logical extension to Right to Repair.
                I don't think it will be much of an issue for most older laptops

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Old Grouch View Post

                  You would also need a royalty-free licence for all 'intellectual property' used by the hardware. There is no point in having the documentation if you can't distribute copies of software which might also include third-party bugfixes or changes.
                  Yeah, it'd require changes in copyright and patent law in every country that adopted such right to repair. Right now, in the US this has many landmines both in copyright and patent law. I don't really hold a lot of hope the current legislation in Congress will adequately address repair rights. There's too much "Stick it to Big Tech" political rhetoric and not enough thoughtful consideration of the real issues in repair work, especially since the companies that really stand to lose here aren't Apple, Amazon, Google, et al. It's Ford, John Deere, GM, Chrysler, Caterpillar, etc. They're the traditional bastions of Main Street US political influence - even though farmers currently despise John Deere which is what's driving the grass roots drive for right-to-repair laws in the US Midwest. Copyright and patent law, which is what John Deere is using to beat farmers over the head with repair lawsuits, can only be addressed at the federal level rather than state level.

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                  • #10
                    This is a great idea - closed software should be handled similarly to patents after a while it expires and must be open for/to everyone.

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