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PCI Express 5.0 Announced With 32GT/s Transfer Rates

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  • PCI Express 5.0 Announced With 32GT/s Transfer Rates

    Phoronix: PCI Express 5.0 Announced With 32GT/s Transfer Rates

    While right now PCI Express 4.0 is only really found in Raptor's Blackbird and Talos II systems or coming up with AMD X570 systems, the PCI SIG today announced PCI Express 5.0...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-5.0-Announced

  • #2
    If if it's going to come with the same major downsides as X570 I really don't care about what it's bringing.

    I am already considering to buy a X470 motherboard for the Ryzen third generation (zen2) processors instead of x570 because I don't like the higher power consumption and even if I might let this pass considering the performance improvements, for sure I cannot let it pass the fact that the chipset requires an active cooler.
    I really don't want any noise coming from the motherboard itself.
    And besides the noise I don't want to worry about what happens when the fan get's stuck by some loose wire, insect, dust or when it will eventually die.
    I was just getting to be happing that we're eliminating one more moving part from the computer slowly replacing the HDDs with SSDs and now another moving part comes directly on the motherboard.
    And there's one thing when a non vital component dies and a whole lot different when the most important component dies (the motherboard).
    I plan to keep my new motherboard for around 10 years like I did with the other ones, but with a moving part I bet that is impossible.
    I see the X50 as:
    More power hungry
    More noisy (because of the fan)
    More failure prone (because of the fan)

    The last two are NO-GO for me, so I made up my mind I would buy an x470 motherboard instead.

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    • #3
      I know I'm going to sound dumb, but SIG did not define what exactly a "GT/s" refers to in their press release. Sounds fast.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by andyprough View Post
        I know I'm going to sound dumb, but SIG did not define what exactly a "GT/s" refers to in their press release. Sounds fast.
        giga-transfers

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
          If if it's going to come with the same major downsides as X570 I really don't care about what it's bringing.

          I am already considering to buy a X470 motherboard for the Ryzen third generation (zen2) processors instead of x570 because I don't like the higher power consumption and even if I might let this pass considering the performance improvements, for sure I cannot let it pass the fact that the chipset requires an active cooler.
          I really don't want any noise coming from the motherboard itself.
          And besides the noise I don't want to worry about what happens when the fan get's stuck by some loose wire, insect, dust or when it will eventually die.
          I was just getting to be happing that we're eliminating one more moving part from the computer slowly replacing the HDDs with SSDs and now another moving part comes directly on the motherboard.
          And there's one thing when a non vital component dies and a whole lot different when the most important component dies (the motherboard).
          I plan to keep my new motherboard for around 10 years like I did with the other ones, but with a moving part I bet that is impossible.
          I see the X50 as:
          More power hungry
          More noisy (because of the fan)
          More failure prone (because of the fan)

          The last two are NO-GO for me, so I made up my mind I would buy an x470 motherboard instead.
          You have to thank AMD for that engineering disaster as that design was built in-house and - as it turns out - drew much more power under certain conditions. I wonder why they let it ship in this condition or planned for a 25W chip in the first place for desktop boards. I also consider active cooling on motherboards a no-go for the exact reasons you mentioned.

          But back on topic, PCIE 4.0 and 5.0 seems to be technology already pushed to their limits. They need retimers and more expensive PCB materials to get a decent signal, making motherboards even more expansive. I hope that GenZ, CCIX and the SFF-TA-1002 connectors will fix this mess and reduce costs for motherboards again while enabling even better functionality. Of course that needs a solution for backwards compatibility. But I can see a transition phase with these two competing connectors on motherboards and phasing PCIE out in the long run.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by xorbe View Post

            giga-transfers
            When I first saw that term years ago, I thought it was giga-Tesla per second.

            We don't even have that many PCIe 4.0 devices on the market, and 5.0 is already announced?

            Comment


            • #7
              What's the (real) issue with high power usage on PCH and using active cooling solution? To me it sounds like "mimimi"

              Comment


              • #8
                HTML typo:

                Originally posted by phoronix View Post
                Code:
                or <a hr[ef="...">coming up with AMD X570 systems</a>,

                Comment


                • #9
                  I thought I heard something about the fans on the X570 boards only spinning up when needed? (which I assume will be under high sustained I/O workloads, like using PCIe 4.0 SSDs). Might have been one of recent videos by Hardware Unboxed.

                  Overall excited by Zen 2 and X570. Hoping to see RX5700 support come to the kernel+mesa soon so I can build a complete new AMD system in August/September.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ms178 View Post

                    You have to thank AMD for that engineering disaster as that design was built in-house and - as it turns out - drew much more power under certain conditions.
                    Is that a design flaw, or just a consequence of saturating two PCIe 4.0 x4 buses over a sustained period (which I understand is the condition which draws more power/requires cooling)?

                    Honest question.

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