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Apple M1 NVMe Support Slated For Linux 5.19

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  • Apple M1 NVMe Support Slated For Linux 5.19

    Phoronix: Apple M1 NVMe Support Slated For Linux 5.19

    The latest Apple M1 excitement on Linux for the mainline kernel is the NVMe driver is slated for introduction in the upcoming Linux 5.19 merge window...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...VMe-Linux-5.19

  • #2
    Is this NVMe drive unreplaceable/vendor-locked?
    It would be the most anti-consumer thing if storage isn't easily replaceable...

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    • #3
      Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
      Is this NVMe drive unreplaceable/vendor-locked?
      It would be the most anti-consumer thing if storage isn't easily replaceable...
      There hasn’t been user-replaceable storage on a Mac Laptop since 2016. The Mac Mini is in the same boat. The Mac Studio does have replaceable storage, but it’s locked down. It sucks.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
        Is this NVMe drive unreplaceable/vendor-locked?
        It would be the most anti-consumer thing if storage isn't easily replaceable...
        On all M1 systems except the Mac Studio the storage is a soldered chip. Not that they can't be replaced in that case, it's been shown to work, but it's not just a standard m.2 drive or something.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by zamadatix View Post

          On all M1 systems except the Mac Studio the storage is a soldered chip. Not that they can't be replaced in that case, it's been shown to work, but it's not just a standard m.2 drive or something.
          The Mac Studio is a weird case. The drives are technically replaceable, but they are just the NVRAM chips. The controller is still integrated into the SOC itself. This lets them do very annoying things like lock the replaceable drives to specific Macs.

          https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2022/03/explaining-the-mac-studios-removable-ssds-and-why-you-cant-just-swap-them-out/
          Last edited by Lbibass; 06 May 2022, 04:01 PM. Reason: Non-amp link

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          • #6
            Just a note: In my opinion, it would be better if NVMe "accelerator chips" (data compression/decompression) were an open standard so that they become a common feature in notebooks and desktop PCs. The physical size of a block on a NVMe device is relatively large (on the order of 1 megabyte), which has a better compression ratio than compressing a 4 KiB block in isolation, and off-line compression (the NVMe device by itself performing re-compression of blocks previously lightly compressed on the fly, when it isn't under load) makes sense. Additionally, a NVMe device might move 512/4096-byte sectors having a common data pattern (such as: text files, executables) into a single block on the device to achieve a higher compression ratio. This seems to be an "unexplored territory" on regular PCs today.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
              Is this NVMe drive unreplaceable/vendor-locked?
              It would be the most anti-consumer thing if storage isn't easily replaceable...
              As already mentioned, the controller is unreplaceable, so if you remove the drive, the data is effectively lost. I guess this is convenient for security purposes.

              To my understanding, you can at least swap in a bigger drive, though you'll want to be sure to copy the contents of the old one or else you lose everything.

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              • #8
                The technical blah blah if the M1 NVMe is that traditional NVMe disks You purchase already have the controller embedded as part of the NVme drive’s pcb. M1 chips are not NVMe, they are just raw storage chips with the controller built into the CPU. Lots of confusion about this going around. A NVMe is a drive like sata and others that has an embedded pcie controller along with raw chips

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
                  Is this NVMe drive unreplaceable/vendor-locked?
                  It would be the most anti-consumer thing if storage isn't easily replaceable...
                  It's Apple...

                  By default you should assume poor quality, bad design, shitty software, and the worst anti-consumer behavior on the market while their fanboys gush their stockholm syndrome all over the place.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by tebruno99 View Post
                    The technical blah blah if the M1 NVMe is that traditional NVMe disks You purchase already have the controller embedded as part of the NVme drive’s pcb. M1 chips are not NVMe, they are just raw storage chips with the controller built into the CPU. Lots of confusion about this going around. A NVMe is a drive like sata and others that has an embedded pcie controller along with raw chips
                    So this less capable apple drive must be a lot cheaper, right.

                    Comment

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