1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking Benchmarking Platform
Phoromatic Test Orchestration

Intel Core i7 3770K Ivy Bridge Linux Performance

Michael Larabel

Published on 23 April 2012
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 7 of 20 - 38 Comments

Starting out our Intel Core i7 3770K benchmarking under Linux are some of the OpenMP-based Fortran-written NPB tests from NASA. In the BT.A test from the NAS Parallel Benchmarks, the Intel Core i7 3960X with its six physical cores plus Hyper Threading reigned supreme in this heavily multi-threaded test. The Intel Core i7 3770K at its stock speeds was 10% faster than the Intel Core i5 2550K and its performance was boosted by another 11% when overclocking the CPU to the modest frequency of 4.30GHz.

With the IS.C test in NPB, which isn't heavily multi-threaded like the rest, the Core i7 3770K comes out well ahead of all other processors -- including the Core i7 3960X. The i7-3960X and i7-3770K both top out at 3.9GHz for their Turbo Boost frequency by default, but even with more physical and logical cores with the Sandy Bridge Extreme, the Ivy Bridge desktop processor was faster. The stock Core i7 3770K was 8.8% faster than the Core i7 3960X and this boost was widened when overclocking. The Core i7 3770K was nearly twice as fast as AMD's current top-end desktop processor, the AMD FX-8150 Bulldozer. For IS.C, the i7-3770K was 14% faster than the popular Sandy Bridge i5-2500K.

With LU.A being able to scale well with multiple cores, the Core i7 3960X obviously comes back out ahead of the quad-core Core i7 3770K plus Hyper Threading. Overclocking the i7-3770K to 4.30GHz yielded a 12% boost in performance for this scientific benchmark.

Latest Linux News
  1. Zapcc Claims To Be A "Much Faster C++ Compiler"
  2. Godot 1.1 Engine Release Brings New 2D Engine
  3. Intel VA-API Driver 1.6 Is Coming
  4. Canonical Is Reportedly Considering An IPO
  5. GNOME 3.18 - GTK3 Now Supports RandR 1.5
  6. Fedora 22 Risks Being Delayed Beyond Next Week
  7. Systemd 220 Has Finally Been Released
  8. LibreOffice 5.0 Beta 1 Released
  9. Allwinner Publishes New CedarX Open-Source Code
  10. ACPI 6 Non-Volatile Memory Device Support / NFIT / LIBND For Linux
  11. Fedora 22 Marches Closer To Release
  12. The Linux 4.0 EXT4 RAID Corruption Bug Has Been Uncovered
Latest Articles & Reviews
  1. Btrfs RAID 0/1 Benchmarks On The Linux 4.1 Kernel
  2. The State Of Various Firefox Features
  3. Intel Iris Graphics Performance With Mesa 10.6
  4. Fedora Workstation 22 Is Looking Great, Running Fantastic
Most Viewed News This Week
  1. The Linux 4.0 Kernel Currently Has An EXT4 Corruption Issue
  2. Rust 1.0 Language Officially Released
  3. AMDGPU Open-Source Driver Code Continues Maturing
  4. Oculus Rift Suspends Linux Development To Focus On Windows
  5. Wine 1.7.43 Works On Desktop Shell Window Support
  6. Spec Ops: The Line Is The Latest Linux Shooter
  7. RadeonSI Gallium3D Driver To Be Enabled For Android
  8. Microsoft Open-Sources The Windows Communication Foundation