1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

A New Commercial Game For Linux That's Not An FPS

Gaming

Published on 16 November 2011 10:57 AM EST
Written by Michael Larabel in Gaming
60 Comments

There's a new commercial game coming to Linux that's not yet-another-first-person-shooter. Besides not being an FPS, one of the most common genres of Linux native commercial games, the game studio behind this title claims "there are some technical details about this game that make it completely unique within Linux."

What's the game and who's behind the port? The game is CoreBreach, an "anti-gravity" racing game that's developed as a joint-venture by two Austrian game studios (CoreCode and nCreate). This racing game -- that also includes some "combat-based game-play" -- was originally written for Apple Mac OS X and the Austrian developers then decided to bring this game to Linux.

I was contacted this morning by Julian Mayer, a developer at CoreCode, about the forthcoming CoreBreach Linux port. Julian shares that the Linux game port is nearly complete and they expect it to go into beta this week. The game will initially be distributed via the Desura Linux client but may come to other distribution platforms at a later date. (For reference, the Mac OS X version costs $6.99 via the Mac App Store.)

The CoreBreach racing game includes six "anti-gravity racing ships", six racing tracks, six combat weapons, a career racing mode, split-screen multi-player, and other gaming features. What makes this game interesting and unique for Linux besides coming from the wonderful land of Puntigamer and Stiegl Paracelsus Zwickl? In a later email to Phoronix, Julian wrote about some of the interesting technical traits.

From the top of my head (and as far as i know):

CoreBreach is the first commercial game ever to use GNUstep. we actually worked closely with the GNUstep project, submitted nearly 50 bugreports and some patches as well. CoreBreach embeds a patched copy of gnustep-svn.

CoreBreach is the first significant project that is written in Objective-C 2.0 and runs on Linux. We are extensively using new 2.0 features like (synthesized) properties (even of C++ entities) and fast enumeration. To enable this we are using a pre-release version of clang/llvm 3.0 and the new Objective-C runtime libobjc2[1] (which is isn't even included in any Linux distribution yet).

CoreBreach is the first non-trivial application to use the C-language extension "Blocks"[2] on Linux. We are extensively using blocks for all animations. Again this is enabled clang/libobjc2.

CoreBreach has a custom 3D-engine written just for the game, its one of only very few 3D engines ever written in Objective-C and besides Oolite[3], the only one that runs on Linux.

Besides the technical details, CoreBreach should be the first "anti-gravity" racing game for Linux!

It's interesting to see their use of LLVM/Clang and they have submitted patches upstream to GNUstep -- the leading open-source implementation of Apple's Cocoa Objective-C libraries. CoreCode is traditionally a development house behind Mac OS X software. Hopefully this will show other Mac OS X studios that it isn't too difficult bringing their Apple titles to Linux.

More information on CoreBreach is available from the game's web-site. Julian also provided this screenshot of CoreBreach running natively on Linux. Look for its Linux beta release soon.

A New Commercial Game For Linux That's Not An FPS


Other recent Linux gaming news include John Carmack personally working around a patent issue in the Doom 3 source-code, Icculus providing new thoughts on Linux gaming, Humble Voxatron not making a million dollars, and Unigine Engine advancements.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
Latest Linux Hardware Reviews
  1. MSI X99S SLI PLUS On Linux
  2. NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 Offers Great Linux Performance
  3. CompuLab Intense-PC2: An Excellent, Fanless, Mini PC Powered By Intel's i7 Haswell
  4. From The Atom 330 To Haswell ULT: Intel Linux Performance Benchmarks
Latest Linux Articles
  1. RunAbove: A POWER8 Compute Cloud With Offerings Up To 176 Threads
  2. 6-Way Ubuntu 14.10 Linux Desktop Benchmarks
  3. Ubuntu 14.10 XMir System Compositor Benchmarks
  4. Btrfs RAID HDD Testing On Ubuntu Linux 14.10
Latest Linux News
  1. openSUSE Factory & Tumbleweed Are Merging
  2. More Fedora Delays: Fedora 21 Beta Slips
  3. Mono Brings C# To The Unreal Engine 4
  4. Coreboot Now Has Support For Intel Broadwell Hardware
  5. Enlightenment's EFL 1.12 Alpha Has Evas GL-DRM Engine, OpenGL ES 1.1 Support
  6. GTK+ Lands Experimental Backend For Mir Display Server
  7. Ubuntu 14.10 Officially Released
  8. Mesa 10.4 Might Re-Enable HyperZ For R600g/RadeonSI
  9. Intel GVT-g GPU Virtualization Moves Closer
  10. GTK+ 3.16 To Bring Several New Features
Latest Forum Discussions
  1. Updated and Optimized Ubuntu Free Graphics Drivers
  2. Ubuntu 16.04 Might Be The Distribution's Last 32-Bit Release
  3. Linux hacker compares Solaris kernel code:
  4. HOPE: The Ease Of Python With The Speed Of C++
  5. Advertisements On Phoronix
  6. Users/Developers Threatening Fork Of Debian GNU/Linux
  7. AMD Releases UVD Video Decode Support For R600 GPUs
  8. Proof that strlcpy is un-needed