AMD Ryzen, Valve, Linux 4.10~4.11 & Kabylake Dominated Q1
Written by Michael Larabel in Phoronix on 26 March 2017 at 08:49 AM EDT. 1 Comment
PHORONIX --
With the first quarter of 2017 drawing to a close next week, here's a look back at the most popular news stories and articles so far this year on Phoronix. Year to date on Phoronix there have already been 842 original news articles and 91 featured articles and Linux hardware reviews.

This year we've seen the launch of AMD's Ryzen processors that dominated much of the talk in our forums over the past month. There's also been more progress by Valve on Linux drivers, Mesa becoming much more mature for both OpenGL and Vulkan implementations, Vulkan continuing to make progress by the day, and the Linux kernel Git continuing to pick up more and more features.

Below is a look at the most-viewed news articles and featured articles/reviews. As always, if you appreciate all of the original content and benchmarks carried out on Phoronix seven days per week, 365 days per year, please consider joining Phoronix Premium to benefit from ad-free viewing, multi-page articles on a single page, and helping to support more Linux hardware benchmarks in the future. PayPal tips are also graciously accepted. Thanks for your support.

AMD's Ryzen Will Really Like A Newer Linux Kernel
AMD's Ryzen CPU is finally shipping in a few days! If you are planning to be an early adopter of AMD Ryzen processors, you will really want to be running a newer Linux kernel release for proper support and performance.

DRM Updates Submitted For Linux 4.11, Torvalds Explodes Over Code Quality
David Airlie submitted the main DRM driver updates for the Linux 4.11 kernel, but Linus Torvalds isn't happy about the code quality of a new addition and is considering not accepting the DRM changes for this next kernel release.

Ten Exciting Features Of The Linux 4.10 Kernel
The Linux 4.10 kernel didn't end up being released today, but was pushed back by an extra week. However, in looking forward to next weekend, here are ten of the features that excite us about Linux 4.10.

Ten Features You Will Not Find In The Mainline Linux 4.10 Kernel
With last weekend mentioning ten exciting features of Linux 4.10, the tables have turned and now we are looking at ten features not found in the mainline

Richard Stallman: Goodbye to GNU Libreboot
The drama over Libreboot, a downstream of Coreboot, wanting to leave the GNU has come to an end.

It's Now Possible To Disable & Strip Down Intel's ME Blob
Many free software advocates have been concerned by Intel's binary-only Management Engine (ME) built into the motherboards on newer generations of Intel motherboards. The good news is there is now a working, third-party approach for disabling the ME and reducing the risk of its binary blobs.

Valve Developer Posts New AMD GPU Debugging Tool, Part Of Improving Linux Driver
Another Valve developer has begun contributing to the open-source AMD Linux graphics driver stack. Besides posting some RADV Vulkan patches last week, today he's announced a new GPU debugging tool he's been working on for AMD's driver/hardware.

NVIDIA Makes Huge Code Contribution To Qt, New Qt 3D Studio
The Qt Company today announced Qt 3D Studio, a new 3D UI authoring system, thanks to NVIDIA providing Qt with hundreds of thousands of lines of source code making up this application.

Valve Has Another Linux Graphics Driver Developer Working On Open-Source AMD
You may have noticed recently that Timothy Arceri has been working on AMD Mesa/Gallium3D improvements while previously he mostly focused on the Intel driver stack at Collabora. It turns out this change-over is due to Arceri having joined Valve to work on the open-source AMD Linux driver stack.

Valve Hires X11 Veteran Keith Packard To Work On The Linux Display Stack
Valve's latest high-profile hire is adding Keith Packard to their roster of Linux graphics driver developers.

And the most viewed featured articles:

AMD Ryzen 7 1800X Linux Benchmarks
The day many of you have been waiting for is finally here: AMD Zen (Ryzen) processors are shipping! Thanks to AMD coming around at the last minute, I received a Ryzen 7 1800X yesterday evening and have been putting it through its paces. Here is my walkthrough of the Linux experience for the AMD Ryzen and new motherboard and a number of the initial Linux benchmarks for this high-end Zen CPU while much more coverage is coming in the hours and days ahead.

Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux Gaming Performance With NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060/1080
It's been a while since last testing Windows 10 vs. Linux on different, newer Linux game ports with a variety of GPUs, but that changed this week. As mentioned this weekend, I've been working on a large, fresh Windows vs. Linux gaming performance comparison. The results available today are for NVIDIA with testing a GeForce GTX 1060 and GTX 1080 on Windows 10 Pro x64 and Ubuntu 16.10 x86_64 with the latest drivers and using a variety of newer Direct3D 11/12 / OpenGL / Vulkan games.

AMD Ryzen 7 1700 Linux Benchmarks: Great Multi-Core Performance For $329
Yesterday we posted launch-day Ryzen 7 1800X Linux benchmarks that were particularly appealing for multi-core / heavily-threaded workloads like code compilation. Given all the code compilation done by Linux users in particular, if you were intrigued by the Ryzen 7 1800X performance but find the $499 USD price-tag to be too higher, today I have my initial benchmark figures on the Ryzen 7 1700. The Ryzen 7 1700 is still eight cores and sixteen threads but will only set you back $329 USD as the current low-end Ryzen processor for what's currently available.

AMD Ryzen 7 1800X vs. Intel Core i7 7700K Linux Gaming Performance
For those craving some Linux gaming benchmarks from the newly-released AMD Ryzen 7 1800X processor, here are some test results. In this initial comparison are benchmarks of the Ryzen 7 1800K to Core i7 7700K when running these processors at stock speeds while using a Radeon R9 Fury graphics card paired with AMDGPU+RadeonSI for the Linux graphics driver stack.

Radeon Windows 10 vs. Linux RadeonSI/RADV Gaming Performance
On Monday I published a Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux gaming performance comparison with NVIDIA GeForce graphics while today the tables have turned and is a Windows vs. Linux gaming benchmark battle with AMD Radeon graphics.

AMD Ryzen CPU Core Scaling Performance
Curious how Ryzen scales across its CPU cores and SMT? Here are some Ubuntu Linux benchmarks testing a Ryzen 7 1700 with different core/thread counts.

GeForce GTX 1080 Ti: Core i7 7700K vs. Ryzen 7 1800X Linux Gaming Performance
Since last week's tests of the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti, a number of Phoronix readers have requested tests of this high-end GP102 graphics card to be done under both the AMD Ryzen 7 1800X and Core i7 7700K. Here are those OpenGL and Vulkan gaming results for those looking at high-end Linux gaming performance.

GCC 7.0 vs. LLVM Clang 4.0 Performance (January 2017)
LLVM Clang 4.0 is set to be released in February while GCC 7 will be released as stable in March~April. For those curious how both compilers are currently performing, here is our latest installment of GCC vs. LLVM Clang benchmarking on Linux x86_64.

Intel Core i3 2100 Sandy Bridge vs. Core i3 7100 Kabylake Performance
At the end of January I published my initial Core i3 7100 Linux benchmarks while for those still on older Sandy Bridge hardware and thinking of upgrading to a Core i3 Kabylake, here are some interesting comparative benchmarks. For these weekend tests are raw performance and performance-per-Watt metrics for the Core i3 2100 Sandy Bridge to the Core i3 7100 Kabylake processors.

Intel Kabylake: Windows 10 vs. Linux OpenGL Performance
For those curious about the current Kabylake graphics performance between Windows 10 and Linux, here are some OpenGL benchmark results under each operating system. Windows 10 Pro x64 was tested and the Linux distributions for comparison were Ubuntu 16.10, Clear Linux, Antergos, Fedora 25 Xfce, and openSUSE Tumbleweed.
About The Author
Author picture

Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated benchmarking software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via MichaelLarabel.com.

Related Phoronix News
Popular News