PipeWire Is Making Progress But Still Needs More Time To Mature
Written by Michael Larabel in GNOME on 26 January 2018 at 10:12 AM EST. 33 Comments
GNOME --
PipeWire was announced last year as a new Red Hat projects with aspirations to be to video as PulseAudio is to audio on the Linux desktop. Other PipeWire goals include professional audio support equal to or better than JACK, full Wayland/Flatpak support, and more. Red Hat is making a lot of progress on PipeWire, but it's not yet ready to be the default on the Linux desktop.

Red Hat's Christian Schaller has shared a status update on PipeWire after discussing the latest state with PipeWire creator Wim Taymans.

PipeWire is quickly working to fill its primary mission of video handling, PipeWire is beginning to work with GNOME's Cheese program, they are moving along with their goal of addressing JACK / professional audio needs, ALSA emulation remains in place, and good Bluetooth support also remains a focus.

Schaller summarized the PipeWire state as:
So you might read this and think, hey if all this work we are almost done right? Well unfortunately no, the components mentioned here are good enough for us to verify the design and features, but they still need a lot of maturing and testing before they will be in a state where we can consider switching Fedora Workstation over to using them by default. So there are many warts that needs to be cleaned up still, but a lot of things have become a lot more tangible now than when we last spoke about PipeWire in September. The video handling we hope to enable in Fedora Workstation 28 as mentioned, while the other pieces we will work towards enabling in later releases as the components mature.

The current state of PipeWire is covered in full via Christian's blog.
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Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated benchmarking software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via MichaelLarabel.com.

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