Microsoft's Linux / Open-Source Actions Of 2017
Written by Michael Larabel in Microsoft on 5 December 2017 at 05:56 AM EST. 17 Comments
MICROSOFT --
It's been another interesting year of Microsoft open-source/Linux announcements.

In 2017 Microsoft hasn't made quite as many Linux/FLOSS announcements as they did in 2016, but there's still a lot. Some of the happenings this calendar year have included:

- Microsoft became a premium sponsor of the OSI, the Open Source Initiative.

- Microsoft was also tossing money at Debian's DebConf 17.

- Performance improvements for Windows Subsystem for Linux that can be found in the Windows 10 Fall Creator's Update while more optimizations are still on the way.

- While earlier in the year, WSL graduated out of beta with Windows Subsystem for Linux running well and openSUSE/Ubuntu can now be setup from the Windows 10 App Store.

- Rolling out a long-awaited update of Skype for Linux, well, those Linux users still needing to use Skype.

- GCC ARM cross-compilation support was added to Microsoft's Visual Studio.

- The Microsoft-owned Xamarin has been developing a new .NET interpreter for Mono. Also in the Mono space, this year brought Mono 5.0.

- Microsoft went public with their work on the Git Virtual File-System (GVFS).

- .NET Core 2.0 rolled out with significant Linux improvements.

- On the graphics front they open-sourced their DirectX shader compiler.

What do you want to see Microsoft do for Linux/open-source in 2018? Or would you rather they get their hands off entirely? Let us know in the forums.

About The Author
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Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated benchmarking software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via MichaelLarabel.com.

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