More Benchmarks Of The Improved Linux Performance With Glibc 2.29
Written by Michael Larabel in GNU on 4 February 2019 at 10:05 AM EST. 6 Comments
GNU --
Yesterday I posted some initial benchmarks looking at the performance improvements with Glibc 2.29, the newest feature release of the GNU C Library. Here are more benchmarks on eight different systems using Glibc 2.29 on Clear linux.

With Clear Linux being the first distribution with Glibc 2.29 readily available, here are more performance tests of this rolling-release distribution before/after the Glibc 2.29 upgrade on an assortment of eight different Intel systems of varying generations.

All of the benchmarks, of course, carried out via the Phoronix Test Suite. This round-up of data is complementary to yesterday's article.


With the FLAC and LAME MP3 encoding performance, which also improved in yesterday's tests with the Core i9 7980XE, that appears to be as a result of AVX-512 optimizations based upon this data set... The Xeon Silver 4108 used in the testing does support AVX-512 and these single-threaded audio encoding tests seem to do a lot better in this case with Glibc 2.29 over Glibc 2.28.

Across the board improvements were found with the R benchmark, the statistical computing language.

Some operations with the Glibc micro-benchmarks like the square root function were faster on Glibc 2.29.

Another real-world test translating to performance improvements across the board was SciKit-Learn.

If you didn't yet read yesterday's article, be sure to see those Glibc 2.29 benchmarks for additional tests.

About The Author
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Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated benchmarking software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via MichaelLarabel.com.

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