How Linux Performance Changed In 2017 With Clear Linux & Ubuntu
Written by Michael Larabel in Operating Systems on 28 December 2017. Page 5 of 5. 25 Comments

Caffe wasn't building with the current Ubuntu 18.04 packaged dependencies, but this test is a particular example showing Intel's relentless optimization work on Clear Linux this year where it's now multiple times faster than where it was performing at the end of 2016 when running out-of-the-box on this Intel Core i7 7740X system.

Tensorflow improved with Ubuntu 18.04 daily over 16.10, but not nearly by the lengths that Clear Linux is now running Tensorflow much faster for those interested in machine learning.

The Redis in-memory database was running abnormally slow on Ubuntu 16.10 but is in much better shape with the 18.04 daily state. Clear Linux also improved its Redis performance this year with the SET operation running 24% faster and well ahead of where it's at when built out-of-the-box on Ubuntu 18.04.

Lastly is PyBench for some Python coverage. The latest 2017 releases of Ubuntu/Clear are faster than at the end of 2016 while the overall performance sided slightly with Clear Linux.

That's where things are right now at the end of 2017. What do you hope to see out of Clear, Ubuntu, and other Linux distributions in 2018? Share with us your thoughts in the forums.

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Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience. Michael has written more than 20,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated benchmarking software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via MichaelLarabel.com.

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