NVIDIA RTX 30 Series vs. AMD Radeon Linux Gaming Performance For April 2021
Written by Michael Larabel in Graphics Cards on 30 April 2021. Page 6 of 6. 26 Comments

For those wishing to see the entire set of 1440p Linux gaming benchmarks run for this article, visit this OpenBenchmarking.org result file.

Similarly, the full set of 4K Linux gaming benchmarks conducted for today's article can be found via this OpenBenchmarking.org result file.

A look at the total GPU power consumption during the span of all the 4K Linux gaming benchmarks for maximum load...

Here are also the GPU core temperature results for all of the 4K benchmarks conducted. Granted, depending upon your particular AIB card and other factors you may experience different results.

Here is the geometric mean of all the 4K benchmark results for the games/benchmarks that successfully ran across the entire stack of graphics cards tested. But, of course, check out the individual results and/or the OpenBenchmarking.org links for checking on the particular games of interest to you. Via the OpenBenchmarking.org result pages you can also dynamically generate your own performance-per-dollar graphs based upon local/available pricing -- given the fluctuating prices during these tight supply chain times, it obviously isn't too useful including the stock pricing graphs within the article itself.

If Vulkan ray-tracing is of interest to you, there are these separate Vulkan RT benchmark results from earlier this month when Radeon Software for Linux debuted its proprietary Vulkan driver support for these extensions. It will be interesting to see how well ray-tracing with RADV performs once that support comes together but for the moment at least it's safe to say NVIDIA has the upperhand there with their ray-tracing driver support maturity.

Another area where NVIDIA's Linux support carries the upperhand too is in the compute support. We are still waiting for AMD to officially support their ROCm compute stack for the Radeon RX 5000/6000 series. There is OpenCL support within their proprietary packaged driver but your mileage may vary depending upon the software.

Those are the current numbers with the drivers as of earlier this month when the testing/re-testing began. Coming up soon will already be a fresh round of tests given the rate of progress being made with the Linux graphics drivers.

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Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience. Michael has written more than 20,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated benchmarking software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via MichaelLarabel.com.

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