Intel Core i7 6800K Benchmarks On Ubuntu + Linux 4.8
Written by Michael Larabel in Processors on 26 September 2016. Page 6 of 6. 18 Comments

While testing these processors an Arctic Cooling Freezer i11 heatsink was used, which is rated for up to 150 Watt CPUs and fits nicely in a 4U rackmount chassis.

The Core i7 6800K had an average temperature of 29.5C with a peak of 45C, which is better than the i7-5960X.

The Core i7 6800K power consumption was slightly higher than the Core i7 5960X and the E5-2609 v4, but lower than the E5-2687W v3 10-core+HT CPU. Thus on a performance-per-Watt basis, the 6800K was only comparable to the Haswell-E but wasn't really anymore efficient:

If you are craving more Linux benchmarks from the Core i7 6800K on Linux, you can also see this OpenBenchmarking.org result file comparing it to some Skylake Xeon CPUs.

Once again, if you would like to see how your own Linux system(s) compare to the Core i7 6800K Linux performance on the 4.8 kernel, simply install our open-source Phoronix Test Suite benchmarking software and run phoronix-test-suite benchmark 1609269-LO-6800K222998 for a fully-automated, reproducible, side-by-side comparison to the results shown in this article.

Stay tuned for additional i7-6800K Linux benchmarks, including of the experimental Turbo Boost Max 3.0 patches, etc. If you appreciate all of our Linux hardware testing on Phoronix, please consider subscribing to Phoronix Premium to help support the site. Those interested in the i7-6800K can find it from NewEgg.com and Amazon.com for about $430 USD.


About The Author
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Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated benchmarking software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via MichaelLarabel.com.


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