CompuLab's Fitlet Is A Very Tiny, Fanless, Linux PC With AMD A10 Micro
Written by Michael Larabel in Computers on 18 June 2015. Page 6 of 6. 15 Comments

If you're interested in looking at more of the results from this performance comparison, aside from the massive comparison results earlier in this article, you can find more of the Fitlet-I performance details via this result file. With the Phoronix Test Suite installed you can also see how your own Linux system(s) compare by running phoronix-test-suite benchmark 1506172-BE-LOWPOW98408 to conduct your own fully-automated, side-by-side performance comparison. As mentioned earlier in this article, the Fitlet-I will be used for daily benchmarking of the latest Linux kernel on Fedora over at if you want any more performance metrics for this tiny, low-power PC.

Overall, the Fitlet-I with AMD A10 Micro-6700T is another win for CompuLab. The Fitlet is very tiny and beats the industry-standard Intel NUC for small PCs, is completely fanless, and offers a wealth of connectivity options including dual Ethernet (or quad Ethernet with the Fitlet-X), multiple USB2/USB3 ports, 802.11ac WiFi that's Linux friendly, and even eSATA connectivity. The build quality of the Fitlet-I is also fantastic -- as has been the case with all CompuLab products I've reviewed over the past five years. As shown by the past few pages of results, the performance is also very compelling and beats out Intel Bay Trail SoCs along with Intel notebook CPUs of past generations -- Core 2 Duo, Core i5 520M, etc.

In the weeks I've been testing this tiny Mullins APU system the main downside encountered is that the Fitlet-I does get very hot to the touch, but it hasn't caused any troubles with the system's operation. The Fitlets can also be a bit pricey if buying the high-end model with Micro-6700T at where it sells for $710 though the basic barebone model costs just $129. At the end of the day though the Fitlet-I is another Linux-friendly, exciting compact PC from CompuLab that's worth considering if you're after a well-built, fan-less, incredibly-compact PC.

About The Author
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Michael Larabel is the principal author of and founded the site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and automated benchmarking software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via

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