Open-Source Linux Graphics: A10-7870K Godavari vs. i7-4790K Haswell vs. i7-5775C Broadwell
Written by Michael Larabel in Graphics Cards on 18 July 2015. Page 1 of 4. 36 Comments

Earlier this week I posted some interesting Linux graphics benchmarks comparing the open-source Mesa/Gallium3D drivers for the Iris Pro 6200 Graphics on the Intel Core i7-5775C "Broadwell" CPU compared to several discrete graphics cards. Those results were quite interesting with this new socketed Intel CPU able to blow discrete mid-range AMD Radeon graphics cards out of the water on the open-source Linux drivers. Here's the next part of the testing in showing how the Iris Pro 6200 graphics compare to Haswell HD Graphics 4600 and the current top-end APU, the AMD A10-7870K Godavari.

This latest i7-5775C Linux comparison is comparing the socketed Broadwell system to an AMD A10-7870K Kaveri Refresh / Godavari system and to an Intel Core i7 4790K Devil's Canyon rig. The i7-4790K is Intel's top-end Haswell desktop processor while the A10-7870K is AMD's recently released minor upgrade over the A10-7850K Kaveri. All three systems were running with 2 x 8GB of DDR3-2133MHz memory, solid-state storage, and running Fedora 22 Linux. The Fedora 22 installations all had their stable release updates installed at the time of testing plus the Rawhide Nodebug Kernel repository was enabled for using the Linux 4.2.0-rc2 x86-64 kernel. Mesa 10.6.1 from Fedora 22 supplied the stable user-space Intel/Radeon open-source graphics support. GNOME Shell 3.16.3 was the desktop in use during testing.

All three systems carried out the same Linux OpenGL tests in a fully-automated and reproducible comparison using the open-source Phoronix Test Suite benchmarking software. Various other Core i7 5775C Linux tests are still in the works, your feedback is appreciated via commenting in the forums or letting me know on Twitter. As always, if you appreciate all of the Linux hardware testing done at Phoronix that caters towards gamers and enthusiasts, please consider subscribing to Phoronix Premium to help support these operations.



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