AMD Ryzen 5 5600X Linux Performance
Written by Michael Larabel in Processors on 6 November 2020. Page 7 of 7. 77 Comments

So how does the Ryzen 5 5600X look overall from the 217 benchmarks run in total?

Going from the Ryzen 5 3600X to Ryzen 5 5600X represents a 22% uplift in our tests atop Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS with the Linux 5.9 kernel. Or if still on an older Ryzen 5 2600X, leaping ahead to the 5600X increases the performance by approximately 52%. The Ryzen 5 5600X outperformed the Core i5 10600K in these benchmarks by 20%.

At $299 USD, the Ryzen 5 5600X still represents great value and delivering comparable performance-per-Watt at large to the Ryzen 5 3600X and ahead of the Core i5 10600K.

Those wanting to go through all these 200+ benchmarks individually as well as seeing the performance-per-dollar metrics for every test can head on over to this OpenBenchmarking.org result file. Lots of data for your enjoyment plus the ability to change the dollar figures depending upon your local currency/pricing and more.

For those wondering about the Linux gaming performance, the Ryzen 5 5600X also came out well ahead of Zen 2 and even the Core i9 10900K in the Linux gaming benchmarks carried out thus far. All those gaming figures via this OpenBenchmarking.org result file.

When looking at the AC system power consumption of the Ryzen 5 5600X compared to the other AMD CPUs on the same system, the Ryzen 5 5600X had an average AC power draw of 113 Watts with a peak of 147 Watts. This was about 10 Watts higher than the Ryzen 5 3600X but around a 9 Watt lower peak and the average power consumption was also much less than when running the Ryzen 5 2600X.

Lastly is a side-by-side look at the Ryzen 5 5600X against the Ryzen 3 3600X for the generational gain in the 200+ Linux benchmarks where there is a statistically significant improvement. The Polyhedron Linpack test yielding the most significant gain from Zen 2 to Zen 3 is similar to what we've seen on the 5900 series. The NCNN neural network framework, PlaidML machine learning, and many other tests were all big winners with the Zen 3 processor. Those wanting to explore just the side-by-side data as an alternative to the large OpenBenchmarking.org result file referenced above can see the 3600X vs. 5600X OpenBenchmarking.org result file extract.

That's the data for now after a day of stressing the Ryzen 5 5600X extensively with the Phoronix Test Suite. At $299 USD this Zen 3 processor delivers significant value and easily surpasses Intel Comet Lake while also being a very nice upgrade even if on a Ryzen 5 3600X. More benchmarks to come next week along with the Ryzen 7 5800X.

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Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience. Michael has written more than 20,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated benchmarking software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via MichaelLarabel.com.

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