Intel Celeron D
Written by Michael Larabel in Processors on 13 November 2004. Page 6 of 6. Add A Comment

Conclusion:

Intel's Celeron D is far from performing like a real Pentium 4, even when overclocked. However, we would like to note that there have been many successful overclocks using the Celeron D 320 and different system components, to arrive at the speed of 3.6GHz and beyond. Heat continues to be a major issue with this Celeron D chip, idling in the range of 50°C and going as high as 70°C with air-cooling. Keep in mind however; the Celeron is designed to be a budget chip, not one geared for playing the latest games or compiling the latest programs, but rather doing general productive tasks such as checking your email, typing up documents, or browsing the Internet. If you are a diehard Intel user and are looking for a BUDGET processor, we would suggest the Celeron D over the traditional Celeron series due to the increased cache and Prescott core. However, this CPU isn't quite a performance chip, leaving the Pentium 4 as Intel's processor of choice to handle all gaming and workstation needs. The Intel Celeron D can be found for roughly $70 USD, making this a CPU that definitely won't burn a hole through your wallet.

Pros:

Budget Processor (~ $70)
Prescott Core
Low Voltage
Performs fine for general tasks
Improved stock HSF
90 nm manufacturing
More cache than original Celeron

Cons:

Heat

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Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience. Michael has written more than 20,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated benchmarking software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via MichaelLarabel.com.

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