Sytrin Nextherm ICS 8200 Intelligent Midi Tower
Written by Michael Larabel in Enclosures on 23 March 2005. Page 4 of 5. Add A Comment

Performance:

Although this intelligent midi tower is very unique, the installation process for all of the components is the same none the less. During the build process, we didn't get stuck anywhere at all and it went very smoothly. After we had installed all of the components, we simply had to place the included thermal sensors accordingly, and made sure everything had a good connection. The components we loaded up in the Sytrin Nextherm ICS 8200 are listed below.

Hardware Components
Processor:Intel Pentium 4 530 (3.0GHz)
Motherboard:DFI LANPARTY UT 915P-T12
Memory:512MB Mushkin PC4000
Graphics Card:Sapphire ATI X300SE
Hard Drives:Western Digital 7200RPM (IDE to SATA)
Optical Drives:Lite-On 52 x 32 x 52
Cooling:Prime Cooler Hypercool 4+
Software Components
Operating System:FedoraCore3
Linux Kernel:2.6.10-1.770


For testing purposes, we had placed the Tsys probe near our processor's heatsink while placing the T2 thermal probe near the top of the chassis next to the ventilation hole. Now with the system built, we turned the system on, powered up the LCD panel; we were immediately stupefied by the extremely sharp quality that the LCD was able to provide. We also enjoyed the dialed gauge, which the numbers and different markings also lit up once the system was powered, making it very easy to read in the middle of darkness. The power usage gauge we felt was very accurate in determining the system’s power consumption (compared against readings provided by the Seasonic PowerAngel meter). Although in most case reviews, we deem it un-necessary to post temperature readings as they're similar among cases except for unique chassis' with a number of openings and fans, the Nextherm ICS 8200 is a special circumstance due to its PC AirCon Thermoelectric Cooling unit. To monitor the CPU temperature, we used LM_Sensors 2.8 in conjunction with Santafu 0.2.4. For the rest of the temperatures, we used the ones provided by the LCD panel on the ICS 8200. Our idle results occurred while the system remained at its default idle state immediately after logging in, while the load was done through CPUBurn-in v1.00 (Linux). Each test was carried out for 30 minutes. In the chart below, OFF refers to neither the intake fan nor TEC PC AirCon running. FAN simply refers to the intake fan running with the TEC off while FAN & TEC is when both devices were powered up. The rest of the cooling devices remained the same during all of the testing. Below are the results.

 
Idle
Load
       
 
OFF
FAN
FAN & TEC
OFF
FAN
FAN & TEC
Tamb:
19
19
19
20
19
19
Tsys:
28
27
23
29
28
25
T2:
27
27
24
27
28
27
AirCon:

 

 

15

 

 

16
 
CPU:
33
32
27
35
33
30
 
°C

As you can see, the temperatures were very close between the intake fan off and on with a difference of only a Celsius or two, but once the AirCon kicked into gear, we seen a huge improvement in temperatures. We were also pleased to see only a marginal difference between the idle and load temperatures. Keeping in mind that a one degree drop down by AirCon Cooling inside the system is entirely different than traditional coolers which are of component level. If you’re so inclined, the cooling power of the air temperature drop can be determined by the following equation.

Q = m x Cp x dT
QCooling Power (Joules)
mAmount of Air (Kg)
Cp1.007 KJ/(KgK) for air at 25°C
dTDifference in temperature between inside/outside of case


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