Intel Xeon 6766E/6780E Sierra Forest vs. Ampere Altra Performance & Power Efficiency

Written by Michael Larabel in Processors on 5 June 2024 at 11:22 AM EDT. Page 2 of 6. 10 Comments.

First up is looking at some database workloads across these server/cloud processors.

ClickHouse benchmark with settings of 100M Rows Hits Dataset, First Run / Cold Cache. EPYC 9684X was the fastest.
ClickHouse benchmark with settings of 100M Rows Hits Dataset, Third Run. EPYC 9684X was the fastest.

With the ClickHouse database server, the Ampere Altra Max M128-30 with its DDR4-3200 memory and Neoverse-N1 cores shows its age in running much slower than the other tested Intel Xeon and AMD EPYC processors.

ClickHouse benchmark with settings of 100M Rows Hits Dataset, Third Run. EPYC 9684X was the fastest.
ClickHouse benchmark with settings of 100M Rows Hits Dataset, Third Run. EPYC 9684X was the fastest.

While the Xeon 6766E/6780E weren't the fastest in raw performance due to competing against Xeon P-cores and the AMD EPYC competition, when it came to power efficiency they do fantastic. The Xeon 6766E/6780E processors both secured the top spot for maximizing power efficiency with the ClickHouse database. The Ampere Altra Max M128-30 meanwhile was at about 74% the power efficiency of the Xeon 6766E. The Ampere Altra Max was positioned between the prior generation Xeon processors and the AMD EPYC Zen 4 processors.

PostgreSQL benchmark with settings of Scaling Factor: 100, Clients: 1000, Mode: Read Write. Xeon 6780E was the fastest.
PostgreSQL benchmark with settings of Scaling Factor: 100, Clients: 1000, Mode: Read Write, Average Latency. Xeon 6780E was the fastest.

With PostgreSQL carrying out read/write workloads, the Xeon 6780E was the fastest of the tested single socket server processors and the Xeon 6766E was performing well up against the AMD EPYC 9654 / 9684X processors. The Ampere Altra Max M128-30 meanwhile with its 128 ARMv8 cores was running similar to the AMD EPYC 8534PN 64-core Siena processor and Xeon Platinum 8380 Ice Lake processor.

PostgreSQL benchmark with settings of Scaling Factor: 100, Clients: 1000, Mode: Read Write, Average Latency. Xeon 6780E was the fastest.

The Ampere Altra Max M128-30 was consuming about 82% the power of the Xeon 6766E while running PostgreSQL but having 88% the number of cores.

RocksDB benchmark with settings of Test: Random Read. Xeon 6780E was the fastest.

While carrying out random reads with the Facebook/Meta RocksDB software, the Ampere Altra Max M128-30 was performing just under the EPYC 9654 while the Xeon 6766E/6780E were the fastest in raw performance thanks to the highest number of cores out of these tested processors.

RocksDB benchmark with settings of Test: Random Read. Xeon 6780E was the fastest.
RocksDB benchmark with settings of Test: Random Read. Xeon 6780E was the fastest.

But surprisingly the power efficiency was so that the Ampere Altra Max M128-30 did deliver similar performance-per-Watt to the Xeon 6780E but the 250-Watt Xeon 6766E had a distant first place finish.

RocksDB benchmark with settings of Test: Read While Writing. EPYC 9754 was the fastest.
RocksDB benchmark with settings of Test: Read While Writing. EPYC 9754 was the fastest.
RocksDB benchmark with settings of Test: Read While Writing. EPYC 9754 was the fastest.

When looking at the performance-per-Watt for reads while writing simultaneously with RocksDB, the Sierra Foreat processors were delivering superior power efficiency along with the AMD EPYC 8004 Siena processors.


Related Articles