Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

GCC 5.5 Released, That's It For GCC5

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • GCC 5.5 Released, That's It For GCC5

    Phoronix: GCC 5.5 Released, That's It For GCC5

    Jakub Jelinek of Red Hat today announced the release of GCC 5.5 compiler that also marks the end of the GCC5 series...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...C-5.5-Released

  • #2
    I'm wondering, why do they keep supporting old GCC version?

    If user wants bug fixes, then he can just install the latest version. At least it forces users to do a upgrade, and not being stuck with historical software.

    Comment


    • #3
      Likely for RHEL, Debian stable, SLE, etc...

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by kravemir View Post
        I'm wondering, why do they keep supporting old GCC version?
        maybe just because they want you to ask about it...

        Originally posted by kravemir View Post
        If user wants bug fixes, then he can just install the latest version. At least it forces users to do a upgrade, and not being stuck with historical software.
        maybe some embedded device developer doesn't want to upgrade his whole build toolchain to get one fix that is important to him. he will use new gcc for next project.

        people usually like to have long support for software that they use.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by kravemir View Post
          I'm wondering, why do they keep supporting old GCC version?

          If user wants bug fixes, then he can just install the latest version. At least it forces users to do a upgrade, and not being stuck with historical software.
          Bugfixes while maintaining compatibility with old versions. An old distro is going to be built around a specific version of GCC. That said forcing users to do an upgrade is never a good idea. Some users won't be able to.

          There are many important use cases for this like Long Term Support distros. Those are far most important because that is what production commercial devices like servers and embedded run.

          Embedded you assume that many single function or limited function devices won't want to upgrade to a newer stack, but still recieve important security updates for the life of the hardware, tied closely to the software, which again, could be decades.

          GNU and Linux are strongest in embedded and server enviroments, so LTS takes precedent over desktops.

          I for one think there is a need for 10-year and 25-year stable distros.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by GI_Jack View Post
            I for one think there is a need for 10-year and 25-year stable distros.
            That would be amazing.

            Comment


            • #7
              'I for one think there is a need for 10-year and 25-year stable distros.'

              Suse Linux enterprise is supported for 13 years

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by TMM_ View Post
                'I for one think there is a need for 10-year and 25-year stable distros.'

                Suse Linux enterprise is supported for 13 years
                rhel 6 too. rhel 7 probably will have extended support too

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by kravemir View Post
                  I'm wondering, why do they keep supporting old GCC version?

                  If user wants bug fixes, then he can just install the latest version. At least it forces users to do a upgrade, and not being stuck with historical software.
                  Production software usually has relatively long support because migrating to the latest version is not something that can be done painlessly, or cheaply.

                  Compilers change and code that before was compiled fine in version X with the version Y breaks and requires fixes and attention, for example in this case.

                  Other software requires downtime, testing and troubleshooting and so on before it can replace the old major version.

                  While bugfixes-only patches can be installed painlessly as they don't affect functionality.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by michal View Post

                    maybe some embedded device developer doesn't want to upgrade his whole build toolchain to get one fix that is important to him. he will use new gcc for next project.

                    people usually like to have long support for software that they use.
                    Linaro is an example. they provide various toolchains, GCC-5.x among them... I use the GCC-5.x branch for building the kernel for my android device... Android in general uses older builds of GCC, so upgrading to say GCC-7 isn't a good option, as it would require a lot of fixes to my kernel sources and it isn't well tested/vetted, so might introduce issues for me, while GCC-5 is a nice fit for now.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X