Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Java JDK 9 Sees Its First Release Candidate

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Java JDK 9 Sees Its First Release Candidate

    Phoronix: Java JDK 9 Sees Its First Release Candidate

    The first release candidate of Oracle's Java JDK 9 is now available for testing...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ease-Candidate

  • #2
    Will it finally support HiDPI on Linux?

    Comment


    • #3
      The only times I use Java is when I code for Android. I might change to Kotlin though (which runs on the JVM though) since Google is starting to support that.

      Personally I like .NET Core much more than Java.

      Comment


      • #4
        I wonder when it will support wayland

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by hauberg View Post
          Will it finally support HiDPI on Linux?
          According to http://openjdk.java.net/projects/jdk9/

          … it will: "263: HiDPI Graphics on Windows and Linux"

          Also older Swing applications would automatically benefit from it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Yay. I still rely on a few crappy Java applications so HiDPI support will be very nice

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by uid313 View Post
              The only times I use Java is when I code for Android. I might change to Kotlin though (which runs on the JVM though) since Google is starting to support that.
              Android doesn't use jvm. It uses dakvik or art.
              The choice between java and kotlin makes no actual difference in the final code -- it is compiled into the same dex format, and really comes down to the syntactic preferences of whoever is writing the code.

              Comment


              • #8
                I have been using Java for writing desktop applications since it's first public release around 1995/6, and with each new release I think the new features may be marginally useful, then usually find that they are very useful. Every couple of years I try a different language for a new project, like Google's Go or Gnome's Vala, and investigate other languages like Ruby, Kotlin and Rust, but I always drift back to Java. Currently I am using OpenJDK 8 and JavaFX, so should I assume the delay in Oracle's Java 9 will impact the release of OpenJDK 9 for Linux?

                I know that some people think Java is too wordy, but I find that with the long variable and method names traditional in Java, I can very quickly pick up code that I wrote 20 years ago and work on it again.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ray54 View Post
                  I have been using Java for writing desktop applications since it's first public release around 1995/6, and with each new release I think the new features may be marginally useful, then usually find that they are very useful. Every couple of years I try a different language for a new project, like Google's Go or Gnome's Vala, and investigate other languages like Ruby, Kotlin and Rust, but I always drift back to Java. Currently I am using OpenJDK 8 and JavaFX, so should I assume the delay in Oracle's Java 9 will impact the release of OpenJDK 9 for Linux?

                  I know that some people think Java is too wordy, but I find that with the long variable and method names traditional in Java, I can very quickly pick up code that I wrote 20 years ago and work on it again.
                  You could also try other JVM languages. There are tons of better languages, Scala and Clojure, just to name a few. ScalaFX is a lot more usable than JavaFX.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ray54 View Post
                    I know that some people think Java is too wordy, but I find that with the long variable and method names traditional in Java, I can very quickly pick up code that I wrote 20 years ago and work on it again.
                    In other words: "well-written code is easy to understand".

                    I've seen way too many Java programs written like shit or using frameworks where the method names meant little to anyone that wasn't the framework developer. I can assure you that forcing people to be wordy is not a sure way to get decent code.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X