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Go 1.8 Released With Various Performance Improvements

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  • Go 1.8 Released With Various Performance Improvements

    Phoronix: Go 1.8 Released With Various Performance Improvements

    Google today announced the release of the Go 1.8 programming language implementation that is coming with six months worth of features and changes...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...o-1.8-Released

  • #2
    Michael
    ​​​​​​​
    Go 1.8 now uses its new compiler back-end on all architectures (with Go 1.8 their new compiler back-end was just used on 64-bit x86)
    same version is mentioned as current and past one

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    • #3
      One of these days, I really need to bite the bullet and learn Go for when I need to rapidly develop higher-performance network applications than Python would give me... but I keep putting it off because its approach to dependencies is such a clear "improvement on C++" design and I've been spoiled by Python and Rust.

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      • #4
        Learned Go a wee bit more than six months ago and haven't been looking back ever since.
        For someone used to more featureful but less elegant languages, it was hard at first but I got used to Go's inherent elegance quite quickly.

        Oh yea. And that language happens to have one of the coolest mascots, next to Octocat

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        • #5
          Yeah I agree. Once you get past the stages of "how the hell do I do X", and "why am I not allowed to do Y", go is a great language to use.

          Coming from python might be tough, if you're not really serious about type hinting.

          I'm still not able to really use the concurrency aspects well, but I think that's more because I coded for years without tackling concurrency, so my mind doesn't do it right.

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          • #6
            I went to my local Go release party, I like the language and speaking to the people that use it.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ssokolow View Post
              One of these days, I really need to bite the bullet and learn Go for when I need to rapidly develop higher-performance network applications than Python would give me... but I keep putting it off because its approach to dependencies is such a clear "improvement on C++" design and I've been spoiled by Python and Rust.
              The feeling i get is that Rust and even Swift will see far wider adoption than Go ever will. There just doesn't seem to be a strong Go community out there. The language certainly has its defenders but adoption is slow and promotion is lacking.

              Mind you this is from someone that mostly uses Python these days. Given that i just dont see Go generating any fire under the seats of developers.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
                The feeling i get is that Rust and even Swift will see far wider adoption than Go ever will. There just doesn't seem to be a strong Go community out there. The language certainly has its defenders but adoption is slow and promotion is lacking.

                Mind you this is from someone that mostly uses Python these days. Given that i just dont see Go generating any fire under the seats of developers.
                You haven't looked hard then...

                Docker, JuJu, Snappy, LXD, Kubernetes, etcd (several the CoreOS utils are in Go actually).
                Including several companies. (Netflix, Uber, Dropbox, Twitch.tv)

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                • #9
                  I like Go and played with it a lot when it first came out. It has a lot going for it, but it is mostly server orientated, with little desktop GUI support (perhaps GTK bindings work properly by now). The CSP side is great for simple and safe parallel processing and overall it is probably the best 'C' like language out there. However, it is annoyingly dictatorial with formatting, and does not have the libraries to compete with Java or C# in the corporate environment. I had another short play with it a few weeks ago, but I don't have anything I need it for at the moment (and perhaps never will).

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                  • #10
                    Why can't these people use C++ like god intended? None of these languages have any advantages. C++ with C style is where it's at. You don't need anything more. Everything else is just syntactic sugar.

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