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GCC 4.5 Is Still Not Ready For Release

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  • phoronix
    started a topic GCC 4.5 Is Still Not Ready For Release

    GCC 4.5 Is Still Not Ready For Release

    Phoronix: GCC 4.5 Is Still Not Ready For Release

    GCC 4.4.0 was released nearly a year ago, but it looks like its one-year anniversary may pass without a new major release of the GNU Compiler Collection. GCC 4.5 was not yet branched back in January due to outstanding P1 regressions, which is also blocking any release candidates from being made available. Now in March there are 16 regressions of P1 status still outstanding...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=ODA2Ng

  • squirrl
    replied
    C is feature complete. Aside from adding new architectures there is not much to gain from a new release.

    I can't even compile most software released four years ago.

    I tend to see it as gaming consoles. It takes them about 10 years to perfect a platform. By that time you got bible on developement for the device. But with developers constantly changing things you can't hope to stay ahead.

    Leave a comment:


  • FireBurn
    replied
    Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
    Compile errors o.O

    GLHF... If the 4.5 release ships with such severe bugs it won't be included in any distro but Fedora...
    If you check the release notes for each major and minor release you will see that they all have fixes for ICEs

    Oh and if it wasn't for Fedora / Redhat we wouldn't have nearly as much effort going into GCC and fixes going into packages to make them compile with the latest versions.

    Try looking in the source RPMs / debs / ebuilds and see who provided the patches applied. I bet more than half of them are provided by Redhat

    Fedora takes the hard road and helps stabilise packages before the other distros jump on the bandwagon. If they didn't do this things simply wouldn't be as stable over the whole Linux ecosystem

    oh and I'm a Gentoo user not a Fedora fanboy

    Leave a comment:


  • V!NCENT
    replied
    Compile errors o.O

    GLHF... If the 4.5 release ships with such severe bugs it won't be included in any distro but Fedora...

    Leave a comment:


  • FireBurn
    replied
    Originally posted by Shining Arcanine View Post
    The MPC library is a fork of the GMP library, which was integrated with GCC 4.4. It is like someone copy and pasted the GCC 4.4 documentation and replaced GMP with MPC in it, but regardless, this change was more about helping MinGW ports of GCC to Windows than anything else, because one of the reasons the GMP library was forked is primarily because its developers were hostile to having it run on Windows. Another was its switch from the LGPL to the GPL. Hypothetically speaking, bug fixes that were included in GMP under the GPL cannot be included in MPC unless their authors release them under the LGPL license, so I am not sure if this is an improvement for GCC or not.



    When did "those regressions will be downgraded to P2 so that this new release can be made" become "it's released when it's ready"? This seems Microsoft's approach to Windows Vista development, and we all know how that turned out.

    I would rather see GCC 4.5 take another year to become stable (possibly with a GCC 4.6 developed with better optimizations in parallel) than to see it to be released with P1 bugs that were downgraded because they were unable to fix them in time for a deadline.
    They still have release rules so just down grading the bugs to P2 doesn't mean they can release, there would also have to be fewer than 100 bugs in total.

    This isn't any different from any previous GCC release where the same has happened

    The P1 bugs are mostly ICE (internal compiler errors) and GCC not building on what should be a primary target.

    Leave a comment:


  • Shining Arcanine
    replied
    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    With GCC 4.5 the MPC library has been integrated to evaluate complex arithmetic at compile time more accurately
    The MPC library is a fork of the GMP library, which was integrated with GCC 4.4. It is like someone copy and pasted the GCC 4.4 documentation and replaced GMP with MPC in it, but regardless, this change was more about helping MinGW ports of GCC to Windows than anything else, because one of the reasons the GMP library was forked is primarily because its developers were hostile to having it run on Windows. Another was its switch from the LGPL to the GPL. Hypothetically speaking, bug fixes that were included in GMP under the GPL cannot be included in MPC unless their authors release them under the LGPL license, so I am not sure if this is an improvement for GCC or not.

    Originally posted by FireBurn View Post
    Though to be fair at least they do have a "it's released when it's ready" mantra rather than rushing utter tosh out the door to meet a schedule
    When did "those regressions will be downgraded to P2 so that this new release can be made" become "it's released when it's ready"? This seems Microsoft's approach to Windows Vista development, and we all know how that turned out.

    I would rather see GCC 4.5 take another year to become stable (possibly with a GCC 4.6 developed with better optimizations in parallel) than to see it to be released with P1 bugs that were downgraded because they were unable to fix them in time for a deadline.

    Leave a comment:


  • V!NCENT
    replied
    Originally posted by FireBurn View Post
    Though to be fair at least they do have a "it's released when it's ready" mantra rather than rushing utter tosh out the door to meet a schedule
    Better a release than no release at all, or when your too old to still operate a computer...

    If these regressions are not functionality but speed, then just release it (other speed improvements will make up for it).

    If these regressions are feature cripple than don't release it.

    But if the devs aren't doing anything at all, then releasing it may make them get their asses in gear. Humans need motivation, you know.

    PS: Debian is for the people that want stable and bug-free software. You can't possibly have an excuse

    Leave a comment:


  • RealNC
    replied
    I hope we won't end up at some point closing everything as WORKSFORME just to make a release :P

    Leave a comment:


  • FireBurn
    replied
    Though to be fair at least they do have a "it's released when it's ready" mantra rather than rushing utter tosh out the door to meet a schedule

    Leave a comment:


  • deanjo
    replied
    Originally posted by SheeEttin View Post
    Well, that's one way to eliminate high-priority bugs... :\
    Sadly this seems to be a growing trend now days and isn't isolated to GCC.

    Leave a comment:

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