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LLVM 17.0 + Clang 17.0 Released With Many New Compiler Features

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  • Jaxad0127
    replied
    Originally posted by bumblebritches57 View Post
    Gnu’s logo is a ram
    It's a gnu. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wildebeest

    Leave a comment:


  • TemplarGR
    replied
    Sadly it will take distros like Arch many months to upgrade. Arch upgraded to 16 just a couple of weeks ago....

    Leave a comment:


  • Serafean
    replied
    Originally posted by Healer_LFG View Post

    Gentoo picks these up pretty quick, but you get to keep the pieces if it breaks
    Indeed, installed clang-17 yesterday:

    Code:
    1695160086:  === (4 of 23) Merging (sys-devel/clang-17.0.1::/var/db/repos/gentoo/sys-devel/clang/clang-17.0.1.ebuild)
    timestamp 1695160086 maps to "Sep 19 2023 23:48:06 GMT+0200". Play time is here.

    Leave a comment:


  • bumblebritches57
    replied
    Originally posted by chuckula View Post
    The dragon logo is definitely cooler than the gnu or whatever GCC users. I declare LLVM to be the victor.
    Gnu’s logo is a ram which always reminds me of baphomet/pentagram.

    not saying that’s the intention, but it does make me think of that.

    Leave a comment:


  • rene
    replied
    to noones surprise it breaks rustc, mesa and the linux kernel w/ clang+lto - as well as was-lbcxx and thus firefox: https://t.ly/WZJeB

    Leave a comment:


  • Healer_LFG
    replied
    Originally posted by saladin View Post
    Now we get to wait months for distros to upgrade. Looking at you, arch.
    Gentoo picks these up pretty quick, but you get to keep the pieces if it breaks

    Leave a comment:


  • chuckula
    replied
    The dragon logo is definitely cooler than the gnu or whatever GCC users. I declare LLVM to be the victor.

    Leave a comment:


  • sdack
    replied
    Originally posted by saladin View Post

    I have to disagree. I've maintained my own GCC installation for a few years, and found LLVM to be a bit more complex to install when I last tried. The other issue is with code that brings LLVM in as a shared library (especially mesa) because LLVM's api is unstable while libgcc's (while not as capable) isn't.
    It is easier than ever. It is now all contained within a single git repository and you no longer need to clone sub-modules manually. CMake will configure it and you can choose whether you want to use Make or Ninja for the build. It is very straightforward. Perhaps try again.

    Leave a comment:


  • discordian
    replied
    Originally posted by saladin View Post

    I have to disagree. I've maintained my own GCC installation for a few years, and found LLVM to be a bit more complex to install when I last tried. The other issue is with code that brings LLVM in as a shared library (especially mesa) because LLVM's api is unstable while libgcc's (while not as capable) isn't.
    bootstrapping gcc so you have a toolchain isolated from your system is quite a chore.
    build a reduced gcc, compile a target glibc, build full gcc.

    clang is a native crosscompiler, and you can easily reuse old/cross gcc, libc++ installations. gcc is a big mess you have to solve for every target.

    Leave a comment:


  • Luke_Wolf
    replied
    Originally posted by sdack View Post
    It is rather easy to install it yourself. Compared to the hiccups with GCC, which I have been installing manually for decades, is LLVM/clang friendlier to install. If you then write your own software or compile code frequently should you not shy away from installing a compiler yourself and keeping up to date with its development.
    Nah it really isn't LLVM and Mesa are tightly coupled so if you use AUR for LLVM you also have to do it for Mesa and it can get to be a real nuisance.

    Leave a comment:

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