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JDK 21 Forked From Mainline For What Will Be The Next Java LTS Release

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  • #11
    Originally posted by rclark View Post
    Wonder how much Java is actually used anymore.
    It's still used in a decent number of enterprise web applications, but from what I've seen it's use in client side applications is pretty limited.

    The one I'm working on for the day job is currently running on Java 11 (on the JBoss application server), but we'll be upgrading to Java 17 in the very near future (a POC exists, we just need to get the previous release out the door first).

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    • #12
      Originally posted by rclark View Post
      Wonder how much Java is actually used anymore. I know we abandoned it when Applets were no longer accepted by our customers security IT departments.... I really liked that idea of applets at the time as I saw the potential there. My current company uses C#, VB, C++, JavaScript for most of their work. In my department we use lots of Python, C, C++. There are a couple of our vendors products that use Java Helper apps. That's about it.
      If I'm not mistaken, the cell/mobile phone market, as well as most portable electronic devices have either bought into or sold their souls to Java. They're likely expensive, partly due to the likely software licensing.

      Never was a fan of Java (programming language), except for real coffee. As a result, I only buy a small amount of needed portable electronic devices.

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      • #13
        I use Java as my main language for programming for both fun & profit, now mostly on the client side.

        In the past I've used Java applications to access a variety of databases, including PostgreSQL. So I know that Java is good there, even back in the days of Java 1.1 with all its limitations.

        Looked at Python, but it is too gimmicky and doesn't support multi-threading very well, compared to Java. Though I did like that its indentation level was syntactically significant, and that you did not need to terminate statements with a semi-colon -- both are advantages over Java.

        If you want to write programs that can make effective use of multiple processor cores, then Java is one of best languages to use - though to be honest, I don't know of a better language in this area. Note that frequently used code paths get compiled into optimized native machine code at run time. So any Java program that runs for a minute or more, will almost certainly run faster than any hand optimized C/C++ program -- with possibly rare exceptions.

        Java is also well suited for complicated applications that need a large to team to develop. Yet, it is also good for writing small utilities and recreational programs for single developers.

        Most, if not all, the Java programs I develop on Linux, will work on other operating systems with no changes needed. That is definitely the case for a Java program I wrote to track down duplicate files independently of file name.

        I used to use C extensively, and got paid handsomely to teach C, but now I use Java. It is one of the over 30 computer languages I've programmed in, which include FORTRAN IV and COBOL.

        I would definitely recommend people to consider learning Java, and to use it for serious programming.
        Last edited by nivag; 09 June 2023, 12:45 AM. Reason: Noticed some silly typos!

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        • #14
          Originally posted by nivag View Post
          I use Java as my main language for programming for both fun & profit, now mostly on the client side. In the past I've used Java applications to access a variety of databases, including PostgreSQL. So I know that Java is good there, even back in the days of Java 1.1 with all its limitations. Looked at Python, but it is too gimmicky and doesn't support multi-threading very well, compared to Java. Though I did like that its indentation level was syntactically significant, and that you did not need to terminate statements with a semi-colon -- both are advantages over Java. If you want to write programs that can make effective use of multiple processor cores, then Java is one of best languages to use - though to be honest, I don't know of a better language in this area. Note that frequently used code paths get compiled into optimized native machine code at run time. So any Java program that runs for a minute or more, will almost certainly run faster than any hand optimized C/C++ program -- with possibly rare exceptions. Java is also well suited for complicated applications that need a large to team to develop. Yet, it is also good for writing small utilities and recreational programs for single developers. Most, if not all, the Java programs I develop on Linux, will work on other operating systems with no changes needed. That is definitely the case for a Java program I wrote to track down duplicate files independently of file name. I used to use C extensively, and got paid handsomely to teach C, but now I use Java. It is one of the over 30 computer languages I've programmed in, which include FORTRAN IV and COBOL. I would definitely recommend people to consider learning Java, and to use it for serious programming.
          I understand your reasons. Despite it isn't, I did read it as astroturfing. Anyway, users like me despise using Java programs for some reason.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by rclark View Post
            Wonder how much Java is actually used anymore. I know we abandoned it when Applets were no longer accepted by our customers security IT departments.... I really liked that idea of applets at the time as I saw the potential there. My current company uses C#, VB, C++, JavaScript for most of their work. In my department we use lots of Python, C, C++. There are a couple of our vendors products that use Java Helper apps. That's about it.
            Java 7 and 8 are very heavily used in backend software in the financial services market. It'll likely remain as such for the foreseeable future.

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            • #16
              AFAIK spring(6+)/boot (3+) needs at least java17 so it the enterprise will start to migrate [ even it is baby steps but still counts ]

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              • #17
                I am hoping that the efforts to integrate native Wayland support go somewhere eventually. So many desktop Java applications have a terrible user experience on Wayland. I built project Wakefield from source a few weeks ago an unfortunately it didn't help any of my broken applications.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by timofonic View Post

                  I understand your reasons. Despite it isn't, I did read it as astroturfing. Anyway, users like me despise using Java programs for some reason.
                  That's because you are not the target audience. This doesn't reflect at all on the quality of the tool. If you are required to use Java by your industry, you'd suck it up and use it despite how much you despise it.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by muncrief View Post
                    I refuse to use OpenJDK!

                    I want ClosedJDK, and everything to be secret like Apple and Microsoft do it

                    "When everything is secret, everything is legal."
                    SearingTruth
                    ‚Äč
                    Here you go:
                    The Microsoft Build of OpenJDK is a new no-cost long-term supported distribution and Microsoft’s new way to collaborate and contribute to the Java ecosystem.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by andyprough View Post

                      I use one java program called DocFetcher, for searching through the text of a pile of assorted documents and spreadsheets for key words. It's been around on GNU/Linux for quite a few years, and is pretty zippy these days.
                      tracker3 and baloo can do it ootb

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