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Intel Software Defined Silicon Linux Driver Sees Latest "Intel On Demand" Updates

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  • Intel Software Defined Silicon Linux Driver Sees Latest "Intel On Demand" Updates

    Phoronix: Intel Software Defined Silicon Linux Driver Sees Latest "Intel On Demand" Updates

    Going back to late last year Intel began working on a new Linux driver for "Software Defined Silicon" as a means of activating licensed hardware features akin to what they tried a decade ago with the "Intel Upgrade Service" for unlocking extra CPU features. The SDSi driver was merged in Linux 5.18 while this afternoon they sent out a rather sizable update to this controversial driver / hardware feature...

    https://www.phoronix.com/news/Intel-...ntel-On-Demand

  • #2
    Oh, the moment this gets cracked.

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    • #3
      I seriously feel the sales/pr people that have to try to make this sound like a good thing for the average user... I mean IBM does this in pretty much 100% of their mainframe hardware these days but they can because they have very limited (if any) direct competition and almost 100% vendor lock in.

      I don't think I could bring myself to buy hardware like this just on principal unless it was the only way to go.

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      • #4
        Telemetry...

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        • #5
          Does AMD do this too? At least then, we could say "choose your evil".

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          • #6
            Originally posted by cjcox View Post
            Does AMD do this too? At least then, we could say "choose your evil".
            If only there were some competitive laptops or small desktops with the Cortex X2 cores. It's proprietary as hell too but at least it stays clear of such rubbish (so far).

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            • #7
              In 5-7 years we might see more competition on the HPC and Datacenter market by the chinese, probably RISC-V or a fork of it.. Hope this obsoletes such "SDS" Features, as they just have to enable everything by default to stay competitive.

              Guess this is the main thing anyway, if you have multiple companies in the same market and you want to gain market share, you just enable all the features, as this essentially costs you nothing..
              Hope the market is dividided more fairly in the coming years between AMD, Intel and hopefully other players with ARM or RISC-V (will take some years).

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              • #8
                locks like these are nothing new, but being able to unlock them like this kinda is, so technically speaking this is nothing but beneficial. but if only it would be used in a decent manor, too bad it wont be.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post
                  locks like these are nothing new, but being able to unlock them like this kinda is, so technically speaking this is nothing but beneficial. but if only it would be used in a decent manor, too bad it wont be.
                  True, but usually it was done in the name of improving yields. Basically produce a wafer of 8 core CPUs, but on a bunch of the dies one or two of the cores fails QA so you lock out two of those cores and call them your 6 core SKU.

                  I think one of the rarer instances of this lockout not being for QA was back in the ATI 9500PRO/9700 era when you could soft mod an ATI Radeon 9500Pro up to the Radeon 9700 Non-Pro with a simple bios flash. They tried to create their SKUs with soft locks like this between the 9500Pro and 9700... and yah it backfired when people figured out it was really easy to "crack" the hardware. Now the performance difference between those SKUs was rather negligible so it wasn't that big of a deal... the Radeon 9700 Non-Pro fizzled out pretty fast as a SKU in general.

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                  • #10
                    Just reading this gave me a rash (I'm allergic to BS).
                    Last edited by DanL; 02 November 2022, 04:29 AM.

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