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Linux exFAT Programs v1.2 Allows Repairing Corrupted Filesystems

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  • Linux exFAT Programs v1.2 Allows Repairing Corrupted Filesystems

    Phoronix: Linux exFAT Programs v1.2 Allows Repairing Corrupted Filesystems

    In addition to the exFAT Linux kernel driver for supporting Microsoft's exFAT file-system on Linux, in user-space is "exfatprogs" providing the various utilities for interacting with this file-system popular on SD/SDCX storage and flash drives. The exfatprogs 1.2 release today brings fsck.exfat support for repairing corrupted exFAT file-systems on Linux...

    https://www.phoronix.com/news/Linux-exFAT-Progs-1.2

  • #2
    Cool!
    I only care about ExFAT because it's the default filesystem for Ventoy and it seems to work great on both Windows 7 and Linux.

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    • #3
      Michael

      Typo

      "repair coorrupted dentry" should be "repair corrupted dentry"

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      • #4
        At last exFAT can fix some corruptions, nice work.

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        • #5
          If you need a modern, universal, supported everywhere file system use UDF instead if you can. Full rw support on all major operating systems. No bad after taste.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by binarybanana View Post
            If you need a modern, universal, supported everywhere file system use UDF instead if you can. Full rw support on all major operating systems. No bad after taste.
            Really ? I have been looking for ages for a common filesystem between macos and linux. The major issue is that macos want to crypt everything it has access to.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by binarybanana View Post
              If you need a modern, universal, supported everywhere file system use UDF instead if you can. Full rw support on all major operating systems. No bad after taste.
              Only works without partitions (e.g. the entire disk must be formatted). Might be a blocker in some cases.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by binarybanana View Post
                If you need a modern, universal, supported everywhere file system use UDF instead if you can. Full rw support on all major operating systems. No bad after taste.
                My experience, on Linux, with ODF has been uniformly dreadful. The idea is wonderful, but the implementation that I was using on Linux (udftools 2.0) meant that for me, (ex)FAT became the de facto standard. I've tried using it as a go-between storage for some Linux installs on an SSD, and on an external USB Hard drive between Linux and Windows. Perhaps it's better now, but I ran into filesystem corruption, and slow performance. I think the idea is wonderful, and I want it to work, but sadly, it didn't work for my use case a few years ago. That was on Windows 7 and Linux udftools version 2.0, the most recent is 2.3, so it might have improved.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by binarybanana View Post
                  If you need a modern, universal, supported everywhere file system use UDF instead if you can. Full rw support on all major operating systems. No bad after taste.
                  UDF is hardly supported everywhere and its aftertaste is bad enough (just look up its design).

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by binarybanana View Post
                    If you need a modern, universal, supported everywhere file system use UDF instead if you can. Full rw support on all major operating systems. No bad after taste.
                    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Univer...#Compatibility
                    https://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man8/mkudffs.8.html
                    No Linux kernel does not have full read write support of UDF with 2.50 and 2.60 versions.

                    binarybanana you run into issues using UDF between operating systems due to different operating systems writing to different UDF versions.

                    exfat does have advantage here. There is not the multi version mess. Now Linux side is getting repair disc features.

                    Yes windows vista and newer issue that Old Grouch mentioned is commonly not corruption. But Windows 7 writes with 2.50 then Linux kernel cannot modify it. Yes Windows will do this even if the volume is tagged 2.01 UDF version.

                    UDF to be truly usable really would need all currently used operating systems to get on the same page on UDF version support or at least obey the UDF disc version tag. Yes windows just updates the volume tag from 2.01 to 2.50 then writes 2.50 without informing the user at times. Note sometimes Windows obeys the UDF disc version tag so write 2.01 because the disc says it 2.01 other times it updates the version tag and writes in 2.50 version and other times it writes in 2.50 and does not update the version tag.

                    Then Linux is unable to deal with this kernel side transparently for user. This is only two OS. Freebsd cannot write UDF at all and only can read 1.50 UDF.

                    https://eshop.macsales.com/blog/8081...-drive-format/

                    Do note the issues mac users mentions with exfat these apply to UDF on top. UDF is not a journal-ed format either.

                    Reality like it or not there is no ideal OS to OS transfer format for removable media.

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