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The Linux Kernel Looks To Drop Support For Intel's ICC Compiler

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  • ryao
    replied
    https://www.intel.com/content/www/us...plete-icx.html

    Intel claims to have made substantial performance improvements in certain code. It is a shame that they do not contribute those optimization passes to LLVM/Clang.

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  • ryao
    replied
    Originally posted by archkde View Post

    What of that did they stop doing 10 years ago? ICC/ICX is still proprietary; the "optimization notice" was in fact removed, but only pretty recently; and AFAIK, fast-math is still enabled by default.
    “puts certain hardware at a disadvantage on purpose”

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  • ryao
    replied
    Originally posted by CochainComplex View Post

    back then you had to pay for the ICC and i was not sure how long the it department is going to subscribe for a license (public research facility). Better dont get trapped in the vendor lockin. It was more a "curiosity thing".
    I remember being able to download it for free around 2011.

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  • archkde
    replied
    Originally posted by ryao View Post

    They claimed to have stopped doing that more than 10 years ago. Also, if I recall correctly, much of what put AMD at a disadvantage was in Intel’s math libraries (which could be used with any compiler), so the blame is misplaced.
    What of that did they stop doing 10 years ago? ICC/ICX is still proprietary; the "optimization notice" was in fact removed, but only pretty recently; and AFAIK, fast-math is still enabled by default.

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  • ryao
    replied
    Originally posted by archkde View Post
    Good riddance. Nobody needs a proprietary and non-compliant compiler that puts certain hardware at a disadvantage on purpose, when better alternatives are available.
    They claimed to have stopped doing that more than 10 years ago. Also, if I recall correctly, much of what put AMD at a disadvantage was in Intel’s math libraries (which could be used with any compiler), so the blame is misplaced.
    Last edited by ryao; 13 October 2022, 12:25 PM.

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  • CommunityMember
    replied
    Originally posted by szymon_g View Post
    why would a piece of software be dependant on the compiler anyway? if it follows standards, it should be compilable on anything that implements it
    The Linux kernel was not strictly C standard compliant. The code base was written with gcc-isms, and the build system presumed gcc (and related utilities). Over the years some of those gcc-isms were replaced with C compliant equivalents, and clang/llvm added some acceptance (and some cases ignoring) gcc-isms and compiler flags, but until recently, making the kernel build with anything other than gcc required out-of-tree patches.

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  • phuclv
    replied
    Originally posted by szymon_g View Post
    why would a piece of software be dependant on the compiler anyway? if it follows standards, it should be compilable on anything that implements it
    unfortunately Linux kernel uses a lot of GCC extensions. Clang had to catch up with those extensions and compile options in order to build Linux

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  • Svyatko
    replied
    Another reason: Intel was developing compilers in Russia.
    Now Intel Labs closed, Intel website for technical details and drivers are unavailable from Russia.
    Twitter website is unavailable (Russian own sanctions for mass media), and many other sites.
    There is a big halt for Russian IT.

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  • szymon_g
    replied
    why would a piece of software be dependant on the compiler anyway? if it follows standards, it should be compilable on anything that implements it

    Leave a comment:


  • archkde
    replied
    Good riddance. Nobody needs a proprietary and non-compliant compiler that puts certain hardware at a disadvantage on purpose, when better alternatives are available.

    Leave a comment:

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