Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OpenJDK Java 19 Released With RISC-V Linux Port, Foreign Function API

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • OpenJDK Java 19 Released With RISC-V Linux Port, Foreign Function API

    Phoronix: OpenJDK Java 19 Released With RISC-V Linux Port, Foreign Function API

    Out today is OpenJDK Java 19 in its general availability form while adding a number of new features...

    https://www.phoronix.com/news/OpenJDK-Java-19-Released

  • #2
    Has it been released yet? I don't find an official download page anywhere. All articles refer to the early access JDK 19 development page (https://openjdk.org/projects/jdk/19/).

    Comment


    • #3
      Some interesting additions for a change. Too bad it's all "in preview form".

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by caligula View Post
        Has it been released yet? I don't find an official download page anywhere. All articles refer to the early access JDK 19 development page (https://openjdk.org/projects/jdk/19/).
        https://adoptium.net/

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by pkunk View Post
          You're late. It wasn't announced yet. The official announcement was posted later on the mailing list. Besides that is not the official channel, it's just one of the distributions.

          Comment


          • #6
            *sighs* and the two software systems I've used that still depend on Java are still stuck on 8 & 11 and show no sign of ever moving past them. That's the problem with Java even more so than the Python 2/3 split. With Java it seems like it's every release something important someone uses breaks.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by stormcrow View Post
              *sighs* and the two software systems I've used that still depend on Java are still stuck on 8 & 11 and show no sign of ever moving past them. That's the problem with Java even more so than the Python 2/3 split. With Java it seems like it's every release something important someone uses breaks.
              You think that's bad?

              One of our partners' product still uses Java 6. I tried changing their bundled startup script to point to a Java 8 installation and it broke spectacularly.

              Comment


              • #8
                These features are language-level stuff, if you don't write code to use them there is no point in upgrading the jvm. Also, don't confuse java (the language) with the jvm (which is the interpreter plus libs) and the jdk (which has the jvm plus the dev stuff). In the past there was like only one jvm and was common for dev to link to (internal) specific jvm libs or depended on their particular behaviour (thinking here jaxws and jaxb for example). It's pretty much like libc implementations, try to run something compiled for msvc and run with glibc or the llvm equivalent and see how far you get. Hint: you will have trouble even with different glibc versions

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by mcloud View Post
                  These features are language-level stuff, if you don't write code to use them there is no point in upgrading the jvm.
                  The JEPs are but a tiny subset of the hundreds of changes and bugfixes that go into every Java release. Michael was quite kind to dig out that TLS and DTLS-related change for example. But there are also important improvements to the Garbage Collectors.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by stormcrow View Post
                    *sighs* and the two software systems I've used that still depend on Java are still stuck on 8 & 11 and show no sign of ever moving past them. That's the problem with Java even more so than the Python 2/3 split. With Java it seems like it's every release something important someone uses breaks.
                    Yeah. I think that, depending upon what you're trying to do, an argument can be made for using Java.latest for a new project because the language has come a long way.

                    But older Java projects are a nightmare, because the language had fewer features and required more boilerplate, and upgrading your JVM version can be dozens or hundreds of engineering-months of effort.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X