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Mold 1.0 Released As A Modern High-Speed Linker Alternative To GNU Gold, LLVM LLD

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  • Mold 1.0 Released As A Modern High-Speed Linker Alternative To GNU Gold, LLVM LLD

    Phoronix: Mold 1.0 Released As A Modern High-Speed Linker Alternative To GNU Gold, LLVM LLD

    Mold 1.0 is a production-ready, high-speed linker alternative to GNU's Gold or LLVM's LLD that currently is supported on Linux systems and written by the original LLD author...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...d-1.0-Released

  • #2
    It does not support LTO it seems.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by babali View Post
      It does not support LTO it seems.
      You can't build anything with fancy linker scripts either, from the issue tracker:
      mold cannot be used to build OS kernels because it doesn't support linker scripts. It's intended to speed up user-land program compilation.

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      • #4
        Anyway I welcome the initiative and I hope that its technology will act as a proof of concept and lead to lld improvements.

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        • #5
          I didn't check of there's a story behind the name "mold" but come on... I know the Linux community loves bad puns, but wasn't "weld" available? It's one way to make links, after all

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          • #6
            Why call it mold when it is new? *lol*

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            • #7
              This is great news. I hate waiting. < 3s to link chromium... awesome. Adds new meaning to <3 !

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              • #8
                Originally posted by babali View Post
                It does not support LTO it seems.
                LTO "linking" isn't really linking. It is compilation. So a different task and done by the compiler.

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                • #9
                  I wonder if some of the techniques can be adapted in lld? mold seems nice, but it's not very feature complete and unlikely to ever become full-featured.

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                  • #10
                    I wish they'd make a graph, like the one shown in the article, except with (user + sys) as the time scale, instead of real time. The reason being that if you have a parallel build with lots of other jobs running, maybe you don't want a few instances of the linker to completely swamp the CPU.

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