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LLVM Is Still Working On Relicensing, Needs Help Locating Some Past Contributors

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  • LLVM Is Still Working On Relicensing, Needs Help Locating Some Past Contributors

    Phoronix: LLVM Is Still Working On Relicensing, Needs Help Locating Some Past Contributors

    For years LLVM has been working on a massive relicensing of its code-base but that effort is still ongoing as they are still trying to track down some past contributors to collect their sign-offs on the change...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...licensing-Help

  • #2
    I wish that PHP would move off the PHP License, and that PostgreSQL would move away from the PostgreSQL License, and that Python move away from the Python Software Foundation License, and that Ruby would move away from the Ruby License.
    That they would all adopt a popular open source license, such as MIT License, 2-clause BSD License, or Apache License 2.0.

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    • #3
      > I wish that PHP would move off the PHP License, and that PostgreSQL would move away from the PostgreSQL License,
      > and that Python move away from the Python Software Foundation License, and that Ruby would move away from
      > the Ruby License.

      "Vanity licenses", they called them ...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by uid313 View Post
        I wish that PHP would move off the PHP License, and that PostgreSQL would move away from the PostgreSQL License, and that Python move away from the Python Software Foundation License, and that Ruby would move away from the Ruby License.
        That they would all adopt a popular open source license, such as MIT License, 2-clause BSD License, or Apache License 2.0.
        The purist in me agrees, but in practice those are all perfectly good and there are a lot better things to do with ones time.

        A 'broad-tent' set of criteria like the DFSG (which later became the basis of the OSD) is a feature, not a bug.

        Now, if you're starting a new project, yes you should absolutely choose one of the big established open source licenses rather than inventing your own.

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        • #5
          Serious question if anyone knows the answer. What happens in the case where the original author of some code has since passed away? I have thought about this before and do not know the answer. But I am curious.

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          • #6
            I bet they wish they went CLA now

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ehansin View Post
              Serious question if anyone knows the answer. What happens in the case where the original author of some code has since passed away? I have thought about this before and do not know the answer. But I am curious.
              IANAL, however I think that it is more or less like any other intellectual properties (e.g. books, songs)...
              The law mandates how handle these situation. Basically, the intellectual property passes to the heirs.



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              • #8
                Oops I’m on the list

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by kreijack View Post
                  IANAL, however I think that it is more or less like any other intellectual properties (e.g. books, songs)...
                  The law mandates how handle these situation. Basically, the intellectual property passes to the heirs.
                  For some contributors, it is likely the heirs/estates/entities that now own the copyright will be as hard (or harder) to track down as the original contributor, so the result may be that the contribution will need to be rewritten by someone, or an evaluation will need to be made by the current board (and consul) that the contribution would be considered de minimis and not realistically subject to any future claims. Clearly finding the individuals and gaining their agreement (and their companies, if the work was done on behalf of the company) is the preferred approach.

                  The last 5% is going to take 95% of the work.

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                  • #10
                    Would there eventually be a point where the project managers get tired of waiting and just change their code without permission? It would probably be easier to change the license of the project and then rewrite the patches of people who finally complain. Though that might be more feasible when the list isn't so long...

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