Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ruby Lands "YJIT" As A Speedy, In-Process JIT Compiler

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #11
    Originally posted by ihatemichael View Post

    I disagree, I don't think forced indentation and lack of switch/case is sane.
    Any IDE and CI tooling can indentation easily, I haven't ever found this to be a practical problem and Python as of 3.10 supports match which is even more powerful

    https://docs.python.org/3/whatsnew/3...ttern-matching

    Comment


    • #12
      Originally posted by RahulSundaram View Post

      Any IDE and CI tooling can indentation easily, I haven't ever found this to be a practical problem and Python as of 3.10 supports match which is even more powerful

      https://docs.python.org/3/whatsnew/3...ttern-matching
      I think for one-liners in the shell it can get annoying sometimes, I use Ruby as a better/modern Perl and need to do that sometimes.

      Nice to see match was added in 3.10, I don't hate Python, I think they are both good languages and both have their place.
      Last edited by ihatemichael; 22 October 2021, 08:48 AM.

      Comment


      • #13
        I like Ruby but always felt like it ran slower than the other high-level scripting languages I've tried. I noticed with 3.0.1 that it was faster and I'm glad they're working on making it even better (just in time for everyone to declare Ruby is "dying" )

        Comment


        • #14
          Originally posted by swagg_boi View Post
          I like Ruby but always felt like it ran slower than the other high-level scripting languages I've tried. I noticed with 3.0.1 that it was faster and I'm glad they're working on making it even better (just in time for everyone to declare Ruby is "dying" )
          Use nicer libraries like Roda and Sequel instead of the bloated mess that Rails is.

          Comment


          • #15
            Originally posted by ihatemichael View Post

            Use nicer libraries like Roda and Sequel instead of the bloated mess that Rails is.
            Roda looks like Sinatra to me... Does this replace Sinatra? I do appreciate the elegance of their "DSL" vs Rails'

            Comment


            • #16
              Originally posted by swagg_boi View Post

              Roda looks like Sinatra to me... Does this replace Sinatra? I do appreciate the elegance of their "DSL" vs Rails'
              Yeah, it's built on Rack like Sinatra and can replace it, see also Rodauth for authentication.

              Jeremy Evans is the man, his libs are underrated but amazing, I wish he got the recognition he deserves.

              Comment


              • #17
                Originally posted by ihatemichael View Post

                I disagree, I don't think forced indentation and lack of switch/case is sane.
                I use both languages with curly braces and forced indention, and I think both are alright.
                The good thing about indention is that it forced code to be properly indented. I think bad thing about indention in Python is that they don't force it to 4 spaces, people can use 2 spaces, 3 spaces, tabs or whatever they want.

                The switch statement exists in many languages, but is actually a rather poor language construct, and it is not very liked. Python since 3.10 supports the match statement which also has cases, it is like the switch statement but saner and more powerful with support for pattern matching.

                Comment


                • #18
                  At work we are also reducing the tasks our Ruby server deals with and drafting plans to replace it it with other, more maintainable technologies.

                  Ruby is ok for small programs, but with larger projects it usually means it's paired with something like RoR, and it becomes an unmaintainable mess once the original author leaves.

                  Even worse very few people that aren't already employed have plenty of experience with Ruby/Ruby On Rails so maintenance is also expensive.

                  Comment


                  • #19
                    Originally posted by mdedetrich View Post

                    At least where I work I am not really seeing it.

                    Node.js is eating Ruby's lunch for anything frontend related and for backend there are better languages depending on what you want to do. Biggest issue with Ruby is similar to Perl, the language is incredibly expressive which is great for smaller projects but for larger ones it ends up turning into a bit of a clusterf**k thats difficult to maintain and due to the way the language is used there is a lot of "magic" behind the scenes which is difficult to figure what is going on.

                    They are thinking of adding in gradual static typing to try and better deal with this problem but at that point you may as well use something like Scala or Go.
                    I mostly agree, never liked the Perl-ish nature of Ruby and find Python a nicer language overall (although it really lacks Ruby's block syntax, yes it has nested functions that achieve the same thing yada yada yada, but it's much more clunky).

                    BUT: as much as I have an aversion for "magic" code, truth be told, Python is far from being immune to it. To the contrary, in its drive to out-OOP Ruby since release 2.2, it went way too far IMO with its metaclasses, decorators and the works. The result is that in a framework like Django, yes the ORM is very nice, almost totally declarative etc but there is an awful lot of hidden "magic" going on.

                    By the way why people move from Ruby to node.js is a big mystery for me, I find that JavaScript is probably the only language in existence that is more loathsome than PHP and Perl combined.

                    Comment


                    • #20
                      Originally posted by ihatemichael View Post

                      It never went away, the hype surrounding it went away but I see that as a good thing.
                      It more or less did go away, really. Its success was largely linked to RoR but there are few new projects developed with it these days and the interest in Ruby evaporated in consequence. Nowadays apart from maintaining existing websites based on RoR, the main use of Ruby is probably Metasploit and that's a niche application. There is no comparison to its direct competitor Python, where a huge part of the typical modern Linux desktop is written in it.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X