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Qt Multimedia Prepares For Qt 6 With Rewritten GStreamer Backend, Other Big Changes

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  • Qt Multimedia Prepares For Qt 6 With Rewritten GStreamer Backend, Other Big Changes

    Phoronix: Qt Multimedia Prepares For Qt 6 With Rewritten GStreamer Backend, Other Big Changes

    Qt Multimedia should return for Qt 6.2's release later this year and is perhaps the module changing the most in its transition from Qt5 to Qt6...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...imedia-For-Qt6

  • #2
    i feel sorry to open source community for all what happened in last decade

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Aryma View Post
      i feel sorry to open source community for all what happened in last decade
      Aside from GNOME3, GTK3, and Wayland I've been pretty happy this past decade. Sorry not sorry, but I still haven't had a good Wayland experience and I'll never get over what they did to GNOME and GTK versions 3.
      • ZFS on Linux
      • KDE Plasma
      • no more ATI Catalyst
      • AMDGPU came out
      • Vulkan
      • Steam Linux
      • D9VK
      • DXVK
      • GalliumNine
      • Wine
      • RetroArch
      • Zstd
      • Lots of File System improvements across the board

      Aside from Nouveau and Nvidia Firmware it's been an awesome decade if you're a Linux Gamer. And there is a lot more I'm missing and can't think of because it's early and I'm only a few sips into my coffee.

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      • #4
        For me the most amazing thing in the last decade is systemd and docker

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        • #5
          Originally posted by usta View Post
          For me the most amazing thing in the last decade is systemd and docker
          See, I knew I was missing something

          How TF did I forget systemd? Not to mention PulseAudio and PipeWire

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          • #6
            How about chromium ? or electron ? or maybe more importantly Rust language

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            • #7
              Hmm it is really interesting last 20 years software area completely changed almost in all parts
              20 years ago we there were browser wars , there isn't any commonly accepted version control system ( yeah there were cvs but it was not enough )
              As far as I can say today is much much easier for new developers because opensource community almost combined and determined standards
              most of the separated parts.
              Wish that I can reborn again with these techs exists , common guys they directly have 12+ cores in their hands and they are not fighting with MB sized rams in their boxes

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              • #8
                Originally posted by usta View Post
                How about chromium ? or electron ? or maybe more importantly Rust language
                I normally never ever use the following phrase, but Electron should die in a fire.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by usta View Post
                  Wish that I can reborn again with these techs exists , common guys they directly have 12+ cores in their hands and they are not fighting with MB sized rams in their boxes
                  It's always been like that. At least you weren't active back in the days of punch cards, but those people probably felt lucky not to be stuck doing all their computations with pencil, paper, and a sliderule.

                  For me, the most liberating point was when it became practical to write 32-bit code. DOS sucked, because even though you could address up to 1 MB, it was often annoying for code to use more than 64k at a time.

                  That said, I'm sure glad I started computing in the age of HDDs and didn't have to sit around waiting for tapes and floppy disks (except when installing software, mostly).
                  Last edited by coder; 27 May 2021, 12:18 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by coder View Post
                    It's always been like that. At least you weren't active back in the days of punch cards, but those people probably felt lucky not to be stuck doing all their computations with pencil, paper, and a sliderule.

                    For me, the most liberating point was when it became practical to write 32-bit code. DOS sucked, because even though you could address up to 1 MB, it was often annoying for code to use more than 64k at a time.

                    That said, I'm sure glad I started computing in the age of HDDs and didn't have to sit around waiting for tapes and floppy disks (except when installing software, mostly).
                    Please insert disk 15 of 194 to continue the installation

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