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Git 2.31 Released With Moving More Of The Bisecting Code To C

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  • Git 2.31 Released With Moving More Of The Bisecting Code To C

    Phoronix: Git 2.31 Released With Moving More Of The Bisecting Code To C

    Git 2.31 is out today as the newest version of this distributed revision control system...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...-2.31-Released

  • #2
    "Continued work on preparing Git itself to be able to use the main branch name by default rather than master."
    Yup, spend more time on nonsense, it will help developers in their work

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    • #3
      I wonder why you'd want the bisect command to be faster. The speed at which you can bisect is dictated by how fast you can check whether the code is broke or not, not by how fast you can do binary search and a checkout.

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      • #4
        What language bisect was written before?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by andrei_me View Post
          What language bisect was written before?
          Yes, i wonder as well. The article doesn't mention it. I took for granted that git was in C... Some parts are using some script lanugage ? Wikipedia mentions C, Shell, Perl, Tck, in that order. Tk is for gitk/view and such. Shell/perl scare me.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by bug77 View Post
            The speed at which you can bisect is dictated by how fast you can check whether the code is broke or not
            If you have a test, you can give it to git bisect run.

            As for language, I guess shell. At least, some of git was written in shellscript.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by orzel View Post

              Yes, i wonder as well. The article doesn't mention it. I took for granted that git was in C... Some parts are using some script lanugage ? Wikipedia mentions C, Shell, Perl, Tck, in that order. Tk is for gitk/view and such. Shell/perl scare me.
              https://github.com/git/git
              Languages used (and percentages) on the right. And yes, initially it was almost completely shell scripting. Linux shell is that good.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by andreano View Post
                If you have a test, you can give it to git bisect run.
                A fair point, but recompiling and running the test still takes a lot more than simply switching revisions. Ah well, I'll just take the faster bisect and shut up now.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by bug77 View Post

                  https://github.com/git/git
                  Languages used (and percentages) on the right. And yes, initially it was almost completely shell scripting. Linux shell is that good.
                  IIRC, it was originally written entirely in sh.

                  That said, I just checked out the git repo and looked at the original commit -- it's entirely C. I have no idea where my recollection came from that it was originally mostly implemented in sh. I am looking for references but can't seem to find any!

                  For those interested in this stuff like I am, here's an interview with Torvalds about git's history 10 years later:

                  https://www.linuxfoundation.org/blog...inus-torvalds/

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by White Wolf View Post
                    "Continued work on preparing Git itself to be able to use the main branch name by default rather than master."
                    There was a word that was once used for "happy" but no one remembers its use. Literally now also means figuratively. Context decides meaning, but some racist people seem to only see slaves and slavers when looking at code.

                    I find it ironic that the same people who are so concerned about the damage from using the word "master" are so often the ones who have no problem applying seriously offensive words (racist, nazi, etc) to describe someone who disagrees with them. Now the words don't mean anything anymore.

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