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Learn To Get Involved In Linux Kernel Development This Spring

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  • Learn To Get Involved In Linux Kernel Development This Spring

    Phoronix: Learn To Get Involved In Linux Kernel Development This Spring

    The Linux kernel mentor program for the spring 2021 period is now accepting applications...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...or-Spring-2021

  • #2
    No thanks. The Linux kernel is written in C, its super easy to shoot yourself in the foot in that language, even when something compiles you cannot be even be half certain that it does what it is suppose to do. Memory leaks, buffer overflows, double frees, format vulnerabilities are lurking everywhere.

    The development is done on mailing lists like if it was still the 60s. Code is submitted as diffs. It's so much more pleasant to issues on GitHub or GitLab and pull requests.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by uid313 View Post
      No thanks. The Linux kernel is written in C, its super easy to shoot yourself in the foot in that language, even when something compiles you cannot be even be half certain that it does what it is suppose to do. Memory leaks, buffer overflows, double frees, format vulnerabilities are lurking everywhere.

      The development is done on mailing lists like if it was still the 60s. Code is submitted as diffs. It's so much more pleasant to issues on GitHub or GitLab and pull requests.
      Trolololo. Valgrind and other tools exist for catching bugs. :^)


      What's wrong w/ using battle tested development methods? The newer alternatives aren't necessarily any better.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Redfoxmoon View Post

        Trolololo. Valgrind and other tools exist for catching bugs. :^)


        What's wrong w/ using battle tested development methods? The newer alternatives aren't necessarily any better.
        Yeah, and gdb exists for finding bugs too, but that's after they've been introduced. C is not a safe language and it has poor safety and null values, and weird error handling like -1.

        Yeah. the newer alternatives is better, which is why the entire world has moved to online web-based issue trackers and pull requests. Only neckbeards still use email and diffs.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by uid313 View Post
          No thanks. The Linux kernel is written in C, its super easy to shoot yourself in the foot in that language, even when something compiles you cannot be even be half certain that it does what it is suppose to do. Memory leaks, buffer overflows, double frees, format vulnerabilities are lurking everywhere.

          The development is done on mailing lists like if it was still the 60s. Code is submitted as diffs. It's so much more pleasant to issues on GitHub or GitLab and pull requests.
          And posts like this is the main reason why Rust receives so much hate...

          Comment


          • #6
            Don't care what language you code in, still going to get bugs. No such thing as a bug free coding language. That be one that does nothing.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by marios View Post

              And posts like this is the main reason why Rust receives so much hate...
              I didn't even mention Rust, there are other languages too which provides better robustness and stronger type safety than C.

              Originally posted by ix900 View Post
              Don't care what language you code in, still going to get bugs. No such thing as a bug free coding language. That be one that does nothing.
              It is true that you be free of bugs because there can be logic bugs, but with some languages you can get rid of entire classes of bugs such as double frees, buffer overflows, etc.

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              • #8
                Buffer overflows still happen in all the languages. It may be harder to debug in C but the bug would exist in another language.
                Memory leaks also exist in garbage collected languages. Double frees maybe don’t happen in them, but can you use that to write a kernel?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by marios View Post

                  And posts like this is the main reason why Rust receives so much hate...
                  Why? I don't see the connection

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                  • #10
                    Please don't!
                    get involved in something more meaningful:
                    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...S-0.6-Released


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