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Rust 1.49 Released With 64-bit ARM Linux Support Rated Tier-1

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  • Rust 1.49 Released With 64-bit ARM Linux Support Rated Tier-1

    Phoronix: Rust 1.49 Released With 64-bit ARM Linux Support Rated Tier-1

    Rust 1.49 was released today for ending out 2020 with this popular programming language. Most notable with Rust 1.49 is the 64-bit ARM Linux support state being promoted...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-1.49-Released

  • #2
    This is to be expected! ARM64/AArch64 is the future! Now, if google would release a binary build of widevine cdm built for Linux ARM64... it would help all those Single Board Computer users and ARM64 laptops running AArch64 Linux distros that can't watch netflix without having to resort into a duplicated system userspace just to run the 32bits arm version of the widevine library I mean, why it has taken so long for them to release a build for AArch64...

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    • #3
      Is RISC-V going to become popular at all outside of microcontrollers? I would've thought that all the companies that are looking for silicon independence or new RISC-based processors to replace x86 would be more willing to jump ship to a non-proprietary system, rather than one controlled by NVIDIA or ARM holdings. Especially the non-US based corporations, who face being cut off.

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      • #4
        I like Rust, it is very nice that the enums not only have variants but that it's variants can also have values, this goes very well together with Rust's other features such as Option<T>, Result<T> and its pattern matching using the match statement.

        At first Rust was a bit daunting, but the more I learnt, the more I liked it. I get a confident feeling when coding in Rust about the reliability of the software that I write.

        However I miss being able to declare trait functions as async (but there is a third-party crate for that), and I don't like that all the async stuff are dependent on different executors which splits up the async crates into different isles so you cannot mix and max all crates.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by uid313 View Post
          I like Rust, it is very nice that the enums not only have variants but that it's variants can also have values, this goes very well together with Rust's other features such as Option<T>, Result<T> and its pattern matching using the match statement.

          At first Rust was a bit daunting, but the more I learnt, the more I liked it. I get a confident feeling when coding in Rust about the reliability of the software that I write.
          I'm also still getting to terms with Rust, but the more I learn, the more I like it.

          Originally posted by uid313 View Post
          However I miss being able to declare trait functions as async (but there is a third-party crate for that), and I don't like that all the async stuff are dependent on different executors which splits up the async crates into different isles so you cannot mix and max all crates.
          This is no different from several other languages capabilities implemented as external crates: you have to do it like that, in order to keep the runtime small enough (still patiently waiting for cargo to learn how to include only the stdlib parts that are actually used). You gain more fine grained control about what you include and you don't, but in exchange, you have to pull in extra crates/dependencies.
          I would like for Rust's leadership to create official support for some of the more popular crates at some point. otherwise, I'd feel rather uneasy going to production with my code depending on some code I don't whether will be supported/maintained next week.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by uid313 View Post
            I like Rust, it is very nice that the enums not only have variants but that it's variants can also have values, this goes very well together with Rust's other features such as Option<T>, Result<T> and its pattern matching using the match statement.

            At first Rust was a bit daunting, but the more I learnt, the more I liked it. I get a confident feeling when coding in Rust about the reliability of the software that I write.

            However I miss being able to declare trait functions as async (but there is a third-party crate for that), and I don't like that all the async stuff are dependent on different executors which splits up the async crates into different isles so you cannot mix and max all crates.
            I don't know what you are saying but everytime I saw the letter T in your post, I took a shot. Happy New Year !

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