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Ruby 3.0 Released With ~3x The Performance

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  • #21
    Originally posted by ssokolow View Post

    Because, for Python, the JIT is a separate project: PyPy.

    ...and PyPy is a little over 4 times faster than CPython. (Excepting, of course, execution patterns that don't give a JIT a chance to latch onto repeated code and translate it to machine code in time for it to help.)
    Python is garbage. Last time college professors sold us on java now it's python. You can't trust college professors or phds.
    Go with nim, try distributing your python code/app on multiple OSes and they youll see the mess that is python(oh which version? oh what mess), with nim there is one file to copy, done, app distributed.
    nim FTW.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by uid313 View Post
      If you're interested in a systems language you want to look into Rust which draws inspiration from Rust
      ..wut?

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      • #23
        Originally posted by onlyLinuxLuvUBack View Post
        Python is garbage. Last time college professors sold us on java now it's python. You can't trust college professors or phds.
        Academic language are first and foremost... academic. Easy to grasp, easy to get something done. They're a starting point, not the end of the journey.
        And while no language is without fault (especially if you insist on using it for the wrong job), both Java and Python are easy to learn and read. Both have extensive 3rd party libraries. Python also has bindings for pretty much whatever you can think of.

        Originally posted by onlyLinuxLuvUBack View Post
        Go with nim, try distributing your python code/app on multiple OSes and they youll see the mess that is python(oh which version? oh what mess), with nim there is one file to copy, done, app distributed.
        nim FTW.
        I'm not sure whether you realize it, but the only advantage you listed for nim, is not specific to nim. It applies to any compiled language. It even applies to Java (if using GraalVM + native-image).

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        • #24
          All the interpreted languages and their package managers end up suffering this "what version" problem when talking about LTS OS support. Perl (and cpan) suffered through it over the years, PHP. ruby had its struggles back in the day (everyone remember dueling 1.8 and 1.9 in ubuntu and debian), python with its drawn out migration from 2.x to 3.x. Its 2020 and just as an example, Datadog has to ship a canned python environment with their agent because you never know if python 2.x or 3.y is installed (properly), if pip is useable or you should load up OS provided python modules. I think most of the power of lambda on aws or cloud functions on google is getting the devs a useable environment without your sysadmins pulling their hair out getting the execution environment to match something usable by the developers.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by uid313 View Post
            If you use Ruby, a language that got popular only thanks to Ruby of Rails and that nobody uses except old Ruby on Rails developers, a language with no influx of new users, then you might want to consider moving on to Python, a hugely popular language, perhaps the world's most popular languages, taught all over the world at universities to people from all backgrounds whether it be mathematicians, statisticians, physicists, engineers or software developers.
            If you're interested in a systems language you want to look into Rust which draws inspiration from Rust and features things familiar to Rust developers such as the double-pipe lambda expression ||, and implicit return statements where you end the line with the expression you want to return without using the return keyword.


            No, Python's performance has long been better than Ruby's.
            Isn't Python's performance similar to other interpreted languages such as PHP, Perl, Tcl, and JavaScript?


            Yes, it did. Ruby was infamous for its poor performance.
            I am a ruby on rails developer and I am not old (28 years old and developing ruby for 4 years). Many companies use ruby on rails for web applications and many of them are young companies.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by onlyLinuxLuvUBack View Post

              Python is garbage. Last time college professors sold us on java now it's python. You can't trust college professors or phds.
              Go with nim, try distributing your python code/app on multiple OSes and they youll see the mess that is python(oh which version? oh what mess), with nim there is one file to copy, done, app distributed.
              nim FTW.
              Let me know when PyQt gets joined by NimQt as a memory-safe way to write a QWidget-based GUI or whatever a Nim equivalent to Django would be called for a way to get Django's ecosystem of reusable modules.

              I'm already using Rust to get Nim's benefits (and more) in other situations.

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              • #27
                Honestly I know a lot of people love to preach "Ruby is only used in Rails" but where I work there are so many products written in Ruby, and we're still starting more! Ruby is a great language for building out v1 and if performance becomes an issue (and you can't scale horizontally) we just re-write the slow parts in Go and shove them into another microservice.

                Ruby's primary purpose is developer happiness and I think it excels at that. It may not be as fast, but the improvements in developer productivity had always made up for it. I'm primarily extremely excited for Ractor's which bring true concurrency and the actor model to Ruby - it should be great to work with!

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                • #28
                  I am a professional Ruby developer both on Rails and off for over four years now and I love it. The Ruby community is very warm and friendly and doesn't bad mouth other languages.

                  Maybe there aren't thousands of new Stack Overflow posts for Ruby every day because the documentation, existing blog posts, and large collection of gems have solved many common problems already and Rubyists aren't afraid to read before posting.

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                  • #29
                    Yast was re-written in Ruby a few years back.

                    Yast itself is not quite ready for Ruby 3.0 (according to TW Review of the week), but it seems to be a goal they are actively pursuing.

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by polarathene View Post

                      ..wut?
                      My bad, I meant to say Rust draws inspiration from Ruby, not Rust draws inspiration from Rust.

                      Originally posted by aronwolf View Post

                      I am a ruby on rails developer and I am not old (28 years old and developing ruby for 4 years). Many companies use ruby on rails for web applications and many of them are young companies.
                      I imagine the only young companies using Ruby are the ones where guy who started the company knew only Ruby, or where the guy who hired didn't know anything about technology, so he just hired some and it ended up with some Ruby guys who never bothered to learn any other language since.

                      Ruby is not just a good technology choice for a startup.

                      Originally posted by lindgrenj6 View Post
                      Honestly I know a lot of people love to preach "Ruby is only used in Rails" but where I work there are so many products written in Ruby, and we're still starting more! Ruby is a great language for building out v1 and if performance becomes an issue (and you can't scale horizontally) we just re-write the slow parts in Go and shove them into another microservice.

                      Ruby's primary purpose is developer happiness and I think it excels at that. It may not be as fast, but the improvements in developer productivity had always made up for it. I'm primarily extremely excited for Ractor's which bring true concurrency and the actor model to Ruby - it should be great to work with!
                      Yeah, that's where you work because its an Ruby shop with Ruby developers and everyone there knows Ruby so of course you have many software written in Ruby and starting more.
                      Python is an even better language to start a v1, or just start with .NET Core from the start then never have to think about slow parts to rewrite.

                      Other languages also brings developer happiness and already have actor models.

                      Originally posted by HarlemSquirrel View Post
                      I am a professional Ruby developer both on Rails and off for over four years now and I love it. The Ruby community is very warm and friendly and doesn't bad mouth other languages.

                      Maybe there aren't thousands of new Stack Overflow posts for Ruby every day because the documentation, existing blog posts, and large collection of gems have solved many common problems already and Rubyists aren't afraid to read before posting.
                      Maybe there aren't any new posts because there are no new people adopting Ruby because they Ruby is not a sound investment of time to learn.

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