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Ruby 3.0 Released With ~3x The Performance

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  • #11
    "Let it never be said that programming is dead
    'Cause there's so little else occupying my head
    There is nothing I need, 'cept the function to breathe
    But I'm not really fussed doesn't matter to me

    Ruby Ruby Ruby Ruby
    Do ya do ya do ya do ya
    Know what your doing, doing to me
    Ruby Ruby Ruby Ruby"

    With apologies to the Kaiser Chiefs.
    Last edited by vladpetric; 27 December 2020, 03:47 PM.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post
      Is there some explanation why are they comparing Ruby 3.0 performance to Ruby 2.0 - instead of using Ruby 2.7 as the baseline? Maybe 2.0 is a typo in their release announcement.
      They set their goal of 3x when starting on working from 2.0 -> 3.0. So 2.1 - 2.7 are all part of the steps to get 3.0 being 3x as fast. So their focus for all these intermediate release was to speed it up as well.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by uid313 View Post
        If you use Ruby, a language that got popular only thanks to Ruby of Rails and that nobody uses except old Ruby on Rails developers, a language with no influx of new users, then you might want to consider moving on to Python, a hugely popular language, perhaps the world's most popular languages, taught all over the world at universities to people from all backgrounds whether it be mathematicians, statisticians, physicists, engineers or software developers.
        Woah, marketing much? I'm sorry, I'm sure you mean well, but this paragraph reads like it was written by someone from a marketing department...

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        • #14
          Originally posted by uid313 View Post
          If you use Ruby, a language that got popular only thanks to Ruby of Rails and that nobody uses except old Ruby on Rails developers
          While that may all be true (libraries and frameworks matter to the ecosystem of a language (what would python be with no libraries, or rust without any crates?)), that tends to discount that some large organizations, such as github, still run their core on ruby.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by Apophis View Post
            Meanwhile Python performance stuck
            Because, for Python, the JIT is a separate project: PyPy.

            ...and PyPy is a little over 4 times faster than CPython. (Excepting, of course, execution patterns that don't give a JIT a chance to latch onto repeated code and translate it to machine code in time for it to help.)

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            • #16
              Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post

              Just a note: If I was asked to choose the best programming language from the top 20 (https://www.tiobe.com/tiobe-index) I wouldn't choose any of them because all of them are missing features I consider essential for solving hard problems.
              I must say, I'm not entirely sure what to make of a language ranking that pits procedural/OO languages (C, C++, PHP, Python,...) against data definition & data manipulation languages (SQL, PL/SQL), and then against super-high-level scientist math toolkits (Matlab).

              The list is perhaps not very useful.
              Last edited by hoohoo; 26 December 2020, 03:09 PM. Reason: pselling misteaks

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              • #17
                Originally posted by JackLilhammers View Post

                What are the features you're missing?
                The only things I can think of are reliability guarantees and maybe some purely functional stuff.
                However I'd argue that your definition of essential might be very personal
                It is a strange post he made: his list goes from assembler to C to some OO languages to scripting languages to Matlab. If super low level is not good enough for him and super high level is not good enough for him and in-the-middle is not good enough for him then I have to echo your question.

                Perhaps he can only solve problems with functional languages (ie: let the runtime figure out his DWIM)?

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by hoohoo View Post

                  It is a strange post he made: his list goes from assembler to C to some OO languages to scripting languages to Matlab. If super low level is not good enough for him and super high level is not good enough for him and in-the-middle is not good enough for him then I have to echo your question.

                  Perhaps he can only solve problems with functional languages (ie: let the runtime figure out his DWIM)?
                  Well, it's not "his" list, the TIOBE Index is a popularity ranking based on search engines data.
                  That's why languages so different are ranked together.
                  However it doesn't mean much more than that. Niche languages or legacy ones get little consideration, but they can be absolutely fundamental to the industry where are used

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by CommunityMember View Post

                    While that may all be true (libraries and frameworks matter to the ecosystem of a language (what would python be with no libraries, or rust without any crates?)), that tends to discount that some large organizations, such as github, still run their core on ruby.
                    Yeah, GitHub is stuck with their old Ruby code base, like Facebook is stuck with their PHP heritage. But Ruby has no future and no newcomers, and is only used for Ruby on Rails and old legacy code bases that went into production and now still runs that.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post

                      Just a note: If I was asked to choose the best programming language from the top 20 (https://www.tiobe.com/tiobe-index) I wouldn't choose any of them because all of them are missing features I consider essential for solving hard problems.
                      Makes sense. Because the languages on that list only got popular because of their inability to solve problems, right?

                      Or maybe you're just a manager and your language of choice must be able to handle "get this done by next week or start looking for another job".

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