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Rust Lands Experimental Cranelift-Based Code Generator - Much Faster Debug Build Times

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  • Rust Lands Experimental Cranelift-Based Code Generator - Much Faster Debug Build Times

    Phoronix: Rust Lands Experimental Cranelift-Based Code Generator - Much Faster Debug Build Times

    Landing yesterday within the Rust code-base is the initial version of a Cranelift code generator back-end. By leveraging the Cranelift code generator that is developed as part of the Bytecode Alliance for WebAssembly, Rustc with Cranelift can experince much faster debug builds...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...anelift-Merged

  • #2
    Typo :<

    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    Phoronix: Rust Lands Experimental Cranelift-Based Code Generator - Much Faster Debug Build Times

    Landing yesterday within the Rust code-base is the initial version of a Cranelift code generator back-end. By leveraging the Cranelift code generator that is developed as part of the Bytecode Alliance for WebAssembly, Rustc with Cranelift can experince much faster debug builds...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...anelift-Merged

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    • #3
      This awesome in itself, but also because this will almost certainly help advance the RISC-V backend for Cranelift.

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      • #4
        Microsoft is also betting on Rust!

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        • #5
          Zig also newly wrote their own non-LLVM backend.

          Reportedly extremely fast debug builds with "binary patching". As a Rust programmer, that made me a bit jelous. Good to see some movement in this direction in the Rust camp.

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          • #6
            Nice! Finally we have a second choice on the backend!

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            • #7
              LLVM on paper looks like a dream come true if you want to write your own compiler as it gives you so much.
              When your project is well under way, you start to realise that the slowness and bloat you are seeing, are all due to LLVM.
              I have been working on my own compiler the past 6 months and the thing I really regret, is using LLVM instead of just compiling to C that can then be compiled down to machine code.

              By using LLVM, I actually limited the portability of my compiler as well. Not all platforms have LLVM working (correctly or at all), while all of them have a working C tool chain.

              BUT I am really happy with how optimised the code are that LLVM produces.

              I can also see a backend switch for my project somewhere in it's future...
              Last edited by Raka555; 28 October 2020, 05:24 AM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Raka555 View Post
                LLVM on paper looks like a dream come true if you want to write your own compiler as it gives you so much.
                When your project is well under way, you start to realise that the slowness and bloat you are seeing, are all due to LLVM.
                I have been working on my own compiler the past 6 months and the thing I really regret, is using LLVM instead of just compiling to C that can then be compiled down to machine code.

                By using LLVM, I actually limited the portability of my compiler as well. Not all platforms have LLVM working (correctly or at all), while all of them have a working C tool chain.

                BUT I am really happy with how optimised the code are that LLVM produces.

                I can also see a backend switch for my project somewhere in it's future...
                We already have a rust compiler that compiles into C. It's called mrustc.

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