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Go 1.15 Released With Much Improved Linker, New CPU Mitigations

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  • Go 1.15 Released With Much Improved Linker, New CPU Mitigations

    Phoronix: Go 1.15 Released With Much Improved Linker, New CPU Mitigations

    Go 1.15 is out as a rather significant update to this popular, modern programming language...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-1.15-Released

  • #2
    Grmm... how nice to lock out pre-SSE2 x86-CPUs.
    Stop TCPA, stupid software patents and corrupt politicians!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Adarion View Post
      Grmm... how nice to lock out pre-SSE2 x86-CPUs.
      The SSE2 patents date to circa 2001 so they should expire between 2021-2023.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by c117152 View Post

        The SSE2 patents date to circa 2001 so they should expire between 2021-2023.
        Change is for x86 only, and AMD CPU support SSE 2 for a long time already. What does the patent has to do with it?

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        • #5
          Future releases will require at least SSE2 support on 386, raising Go's minimum GOARCH=386 requirement to the Intel Pentium 4 (released in 2000) or AMD Opteron/Athlon 64 (released in 2003)
          So if you're both a GO developer and are running a PC from the 90s you might want to think about upgrading

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          • #6
            I don't think this is a "rather significant update", quite the contrary. Of course no one will ever complain about better linking :P

            All I'm missing is an idea for a personal project, so I can get more first-hand experience with Go.

            skeevy420 I don't have a problem with the dropped support, but shouldn't the architecture be 586 with that change in place?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by bug77 View Post

              skeevy420 I don't have a problem with the dropped support, but shouldn't the architecture be 586 with that change in place?
              You'd think so based on what we traditionally expect the i*86s to mean, but I have no idea outside of what their release notes say w/o digging into their sources to see what value correlates to what with that variable.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

                You'd think so based on what we traditionally expect the i*86s to mean, but I have no idea outside of what their release notes say w/o digging into their sources to see what value correlates to what with that variable.
                They probably didn't want to deal with removing one profile while adding back another. Or they simply didn't think about it, or didn't finalize things yet (the change will be in place after 1.15).

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by c117152 View Post

                  The SSE2 patents date to circa 2001 so they should expire between 2021-2023.
                  So you are assuming that any old silicon will start executing SSE2 instructions once patents expire?

                  Oh, wait ... Intel's Quark CPUs were released in 2013 (and surely didn't have any patent restrictions), but don't support SSE2.
                  So no Golang on any of those Arduino and Galileo development boards with Quark CPU: https://www.arduino.cc/en/ArduinoCer...telGalileoGen2

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by pkese View Post

                    So you are assuming that any old silicon will start executing SSE2 instructions once patents expire?

                    Oh, wait ... Intel's Quark CPUs were released in 2013 (and surely didn't have any patent restrictions), but don't support SSE2.
                    So no Golang on any of those Arduino and Galileo development boards with Quark CPU: https://www.arduino.cc/en/ArduinoCer...telGalileoGen2
                    Are people using golang on Arduino? And, for low power solutions, there are better boards out there, based on ARM.

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