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Flatpak 1.8 Released For This Leading Linux App Sandboxing / Distribution Tech

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  • #21
    Originally posted by stargazer View Post

    Then you notice you installed it on a 500GB SSD and used barely 1/1000th of the available space.
    This attitude is one of the worst things in the software community at the moment.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by Templar82 View Post
      This attitude is one of the worst things in the software community at the moment.
      Indeed, this obsessant complaining over the betterment of software they don't even use. People like uid313 seems to think that just because their tiny brains can't fathom the advantages of this enormously popular package management tool, that automatically it's useless to everyone. This isn't specific to software development though, you see this shitty attitude in every comment section on the internet.
      Last edited by arokh; 06-25-2020, 01:27 PM.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by Candy View Post

        a) you shouldn't be using abandoned software in first place
        b) if your software isn't maintained anymore, then it must be worth nothing

        At least I haven't seen or been using any software, that requires ancient libraries

        AND

        The frequency in how many distributions change versioning means - people keep updating their systems for the sake of updating, not for the sake of using old software.

        AND

        Nobody knows how long flatpaks guarantees you a running runtime on newer linux installations.

        So at the end flatpak is just another saussage that is hanging in the air - trying to convince people with the "security" and/or "breaking dependencies" kind of garbage, that no one really gives a flying shit for. Its just all a compendium of meaningless words - trying to catch those, who try to believe.
        Clearly you haven't developed/deployed any non-toy apps on more than one distribution.

        Not all developer wanna deal with tons of different distributions, and at the end of the day they will either
        a) only care some random LTS version of Ubuntu and treat other distros as non-existing;
        b) bundle all libraries it's using, and becomes another flatpak minus shared runtime and security updates.

        by the way manylinux is effectively b), and it seems all ignorant ones in this thread are fine about it.
        Last edited by zxy_thf; 06-24-2020, 05:53 PM.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by arokh View Post

          Indeed, this obsessant complaining over the betterment of software they don't even use. People like stargazer seems to think that just because their tiny brains can't fathom the advantages of this enormously popular package management tool, that automatically it's useless to everyone. This isn't specific to software development though, you see this shitty attitude in every comment section on the internet.
          Before you complain about other people's intelligence, you might want to actually read the thread. The original poster complained about the additional space flatpacked packages took up and I was pointing out this is miniscule compared to modern system resources. In other words I was defending Flatpak, which I rather like. But if you would rather waste your time being derogatory about people's intelligence rather than actually spend a few seconds developing comprehension, well that is your choice.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by uid313 View Post

            Yeah, 11.8 MB after you installed all the runtimes and dependencies. If you had a clean system, then installed that it would pull down the half a gigabyte of runtimes.
            What is a clean system? A totally zeroed out hard drive? If not, the size of that hypothetical Hello World would have to account for all its dependencies as well.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by uid313 View Post
              Yeah, 11.8 MB after you installed all the runtimes and dependencies. If you had a clean system, then installed that it would pull down the half a gigabyte of runtimes.
              If you install only one Flatpak, then you are right that it is wasteful. But the idea is that you would have many Flatpaks installed using the same set of runtimes. Think of a system like Fedora Silverblue where almost all your user applications are Flatpaks, and suddenly this isn't such a bad deal.

              Is there still some cost to it? Of course. However the advantages are not just portability, but also isolation and security, which also leads to reliability. Silverblue lets you install install the applications you need without changing the locked-down operating system. This means a lot less chance for things to go wrong. Indeed, you don't even need root access. And you get phone-like security per app, where you can decide that an app from a less trusted source won't get risky privileges.

              In the end Flatpak can lead to a better user experience: safe and easy access to the latest versions of apps.

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              • #27
                Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                You write a Hello World program and it is 45 bytes, then you package it with Snap or Flatpak and then it is half a gigabyte.
                I'd be surprised if tinygo's helloworld flatpak image is greater than 10mb. Have you tried packaging a small statically compiled binary?

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                • #28
                  It's time to light the phoronix sky signal, what will be a fair dance off in flatpak vs old static binary ?
                  Minetest has flat/snap/ deb.
                  Last edited by onlyLinuxLuvUBack; 06-24-2020, 10:29 PM.

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                  • #29
                    appimages actually work. Flatpak normally gives me an app with broken functions.

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                    • #30
                      I like AppImage. I tried flatpaking a Qt application of mine that also uses libvlc and indeed it ends up huge. I then did an AppImage instead, which includes Qt, its plugins, libVLC, its deps and plugins, ffmpeg, SDL, flac, vorbis, X11 deps, etc, etc, etc.

                      End result: 35MB

                      Meanwhile in flatpak land, I have only two apps installed in it (Discord and RetroArch.) This is the result:

                      Code:
                      $ du -sh /var/lib/flatpak/
                      6.7G /var/lib/flatpak/

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